2018 BMW 440i xDrive Coupe

440i-8Ah, yes indeed, some days I get to drive around feelin’ like a bigshot.

You know you’re getting into a high-end sports machine when, after you take your position in the driver’s chair and start ‘er up, a little mechanical arm pushes out the shoulder strap of your seatbelt so it can be easily reached.

The seat bolsters cozy up on your sides (to whatever position you have set the memory seat to), and the projected heads-up display lights up in your field of view just above the hood line.

BMW offers one of the most comfortable seats I have found in any similarly high-end luxury/performance machine, with a full range of adjustment – which is great if you are a tall-and-skinny type such as myself, who enjoys the aggressive lumbar support and ability to lengthen the thigh support portion of the driver’s perch.

In fact, I would call it my favorite seat in the segment, except I think it may be tied for first place with the one found in one of the 440i’s closest home-country competitors, Mercedes’ E 400 Coupe.

(Incidentally, while the two are very similar in dimensions, the 440i is about 70mm shorter overall than the E400, but the wheelbase is longer by 50 mm).

My test vehicle is one of three of the available models under the 4-series umbrella – there is the Coupe, Cabriolet and Grand Coupé (which is a four-door, so yeah, I know, not technically a ‘coupe’, but what can I say).

A buyer can further make the choice between all-wheel drive (xDrive, in BMW parlance) and rear-wheel powertrains; and so it is that the full name of my test vehicle is 440i xDrive Coupe. Simple, no?

Additionally, this particular one is further enhanced by the addition of several option packages (which is why it tops out at over 70K).

Notably, the M performance package group, which adds not only a generous sprinkling of M-badging throughout the car, from kick plates to tailpipes, but boosts the horsepower of the 440i’s inline six-cylinder powerplant from its base rating of 320 ponies (and 330 lb.-ft. of torque) up to 355hp and 369 lb.-ft.

The takeaway here is that the 4 doesn’t lack power. Acceleration in any of the vehicle’s driving modes is quick – and I mean speeding-ticket quick; you’ll want to keep an eye on the digital speed readout on your heads up display – and incredibly smooth, as one might expect from BMW.

Handling is superb, the car’s ride is excellent, if decidedly tuned to the ‘sporty’ end of the spectrum (BMW boasts of a newly stiffened suspension in all the 4 series models, particularly the M Sport suspension) and an eight speed automatic transmission manages the power masterfully in my test car; but driving purists need not worry, the 440i can also be had with a six-speed manual gearbox.

Inside – in the front row, anyway – an occupant finds good headroom, tight everything else, but that is how it is supposed to be. The car is intended to hold you firmly (but comfortably) in place with all the necessary controls close at hand; provided you don’t mind BMW’s user-interface module (now called iDrive 6.0, which has also been made easier to work with for this latest generation).

Wrap all that up in BMW’s ever-evolving styling and you have one of the best looking two door coupes on the road. The 440i exterior is rolling sculpture from any angle, helped out by a reworked rear tail light treatment for 2018.

The interior is a coherent collection of high-end materials and a console-and-cluster layout that fans of the brand will love, but here’s the thing: you have to be a fan of the company’s design language.

That is pretty much the only major detraction for anyone considering the 440i (well, that and the price, but we’ll get to that). I showed my test car to a couple of owners of current Benz and Audi products, and their reaction was that the Beemer was a bit too austere for their tastes.

The sticker for a base 440i xDrive Coupe starts at $57,550, which is already more than I make in a week, but that won’t be the one I want.

No indeed, to get the vehicle up to the high level of comfort/ luxury/ premium-ness that I figure a buyer in this segment would require, a potential customer would have to consider the packages tacked onto this one, in order to feel like a bigshot like me.

By the time you add the enhanced Premium Package, the Driver assistance and Connectivity packages, the M Performance group and three standalone options, the car whistles past seventy grand and pulls up at $73,190