Night at the Museum

zinc

Ford research engineer Mica DeBolt (r), and executive chef David Omar of Zinc restaurant pose for a photo in the back of a C-Max Energi vehicle; surrounded by many of the ingredients of the Sustainability Feast held in October.

Ford Motor Co often gets overlooked when people are naming carmakers who put a focus on recycling and environmental concerns; but the company has been a leader in the field since long before it became a topic of everyday conversation.ff3

I’ve visited the Rouge Plant in Michigan, and surprised at the level of recovery and ‘green’ technology they have made a central part of the operation; I’ve attended presentations about their extensive use of recycled materials for insulation and filler and seat upholstery (back in 2008 the company put out the first Mustang that incorporated soybean oil-based foam in the seat padding, you may recall).

Research continues constantly, and Ford occasionally takes its PR out into communities to spread the word – which is what they did this October in a clever event here in Edmonton (and several other cities across the country) billed as the Sustainability Feast.ff1

Hosted by up-and-coming research engineer Mica DeBolt, and catered by local food impresario David Omar (the executive chef at the Zinc restaurant downtown), the event showcased not only the latest ideas from the Blue Oval, from the use of organic materials throughout the company’s lineup to forward-looking partnerships in the future.

I didn’t know, for example, that Ford is exploring partnerships with Jose Cuervo (for re-use of material from the agave plants that tequila is made from) and Heinz in Ontario (for tomato plant material recovery, obviously).

Hosted at the new Art Gallery of Alberta (while it has actually been around for a few years now, I still think of it as the “new” gallery, because I am way behind in my cultural experience), the event presented the attendees with food as well as information.ff2

All of the dishes featured ingredients that can also be found in Ford’s vehicles – soy, rice, wheat, edamame, corn, and various derivatives thereof.

 

 

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