2018 Mercedes-Benz C 300 Wagon

This time out we have a wagon, and not just any wagon, mind you, but a premium vehicle from Mercedes, in the form of a long-roofed C- class: a 2018 C 300 Wagon.

I’m a big fan of hatchbacks, so it stands to reason that a wagon-bodied car is equally appealing to me; what with them bringing the convenience of a five-door vehicle, just, you know, longer.

This bodystyle seems to make an appearance from time to time in cars from a number of manufacturers, hangs around for a product cycle or two and then fades away. I’m thinking of a few that I have liked over the years – Mazda’s Protege5 (and later the Mazda6 wagon from the mid-aughts, Subaru’s Legacy wagon, heck even the Dodge Magnum, I’ll count that too.

But this German family-friendly conveyance is a bit different. More of an upper-class status machine, more executive caliber, fancier all around, and with more bells and whistles.

Its a good time of year to flail about in the C Wagon, for as you see it is a pretty cold day out there; with repeated dumpings of snow over the past few days. The Benz tester sport Mercedes awd system (called 4MATIC by the company) and has been handling itself admirably.

Now that’s a cluster. I always opt for the digital speedometer display, of the choices the C 300 offers

Notice, too, that the C isn’t a crossover, so it doesn’t have quite the ground clearance that you would get in models like the GLC, but I haven’t got the car stuck yet and it grips the road competently and handles well in these conditions.

It has power enough, although the C 300s 2.0 litre turbo engine isn’t at the top of the class, but 241 horses and 273 lb.-ft of torque haul it around with ample to spare. Acceleration is good, in any of the drive modes (I ran it mostly in Eco, just for the fuel economy benefits, but the C comes alive with Sport and Sport+ modes that tailor the combination of engine response and transmission behavior to a more active driving style.

A 9-speed automatic transmission marshals the engine power (and there are steering mounted paddle shifters if you like to get involved in changing your own gears, but really, I found the C’s 9G-TRONIC just fine making its own decisions).

Outwardly, this is a good-looking wagon – more so than it looks in the photos, as it is covered in ice – and easily recognizable as being part of the Benz family.

It is a piece of art inside as well, very comfortable (in a ‘cozy’ sort of way, as the C class is smaller overall than Mercedes’ E or S class vehicles. The seats are upholstered Artico leather (or ‘leatherlike substance’, if you will) comfortable in both rows and favoring the driver with a cockpit-like feel.

I loved the Burmester sound system in the test model, and the additional (and optional) technology included in this one fleshed out the space age appeal of the C with a 360-degree bird’s eye view simulation displayed on the center console monitor.

In case you haven’t been in a Benz for a while, here’s the main controller set for the company’s COMAND system for accessing the various onboard functions. It… requires some getting used to, but frankly I think I like it as well as Lexus’ touchpad, or BMW’s iDrive.

The car rides beautifully, of course, and that is the company’s main claim to fame. I don’t think I’ve ever had a Benz – and I mean any of the models – that anyone I had out for a ride didn’t remark on the incredible smoothness and quiet that almost leaves a passenger disconnected from the road. It’s actually a pretty relaxing way to be ferried around.

Through and through, the 2018 C 300 wagon is quite a machine, certainly more practical and versatile than the sedan version of the C, and this one here is very well equipped; but there’s a ‘but’ attached to this statement my friends.

For you see, to make it this well equipped, many an option package was included with the car, and as you might imagine it all comes at a price.

Starting at an initial buy-in of $46,000, the wagon got a $5000 Premium package, Premium Plus package, Selenite grey paintjob, heated steering wheel, satellite radio and the upgraded sound system, all at additional expense, in addition to the ‘dark ash wood trim. Here’s a breakdown: C 300 Wagon_2018_WDDWH4KB7JF579954

And that took the whole thing up to $57,865. Now of course that’s nothing to a couple of high rollers like you and I, gentle viewer, but make no mistake, that’s getting up there.

And this is a thing that always kind of bugs me, when an already pricey car requires a suite of add-ons to bring it to the level of desirability that attracted you to the brand in the first place.

Nevertheless, that’s just me.

Feel free to check out a quick video of the C Wagon on our Youtube channel!

 

 

 

 

Mercedes Benz E 400 Coupe

For 2018, a wicked two-door for the well-heeled 

Mercedes doesn’t require introduction in the world of tony, high-end vehicles, and the company offers an exhaustive range of choice for buyers across many pricepoints.

Not ‘any’ pricepoints, mind you, the pantheon of Benz is geared toward the customer with a premium car budget; but when you’re dressing for success and trying to impress the partners at the firm, that’s when you turn to German luxury and styling.

And the E-Class is the one to turn to, slightly better from a status standpoint than the C-Class, a few notches below the S-Class, and boasting major changes for this model year: the E400 4MATIC coupe.

(as is my wont, that will be the only time I spell it all in capitals like that. And, as you no doubt already know, 4Matic is Benz-speak for all-wheel drive).

The E400 has expanded for 2018, being both longer and wider (and just a little over an inch taller) than last year’s, and the engine still rates the same: a twin-turbo V6 capable of 329 horsepower and 354 lb.-ft. of torque.

Of course, if all you wanted was a powerful two-door, you’d buy a Mustang and save some money (unless you went with a Shelby Fastback, which is actually more expensive than the base E400), but if you’re shopping this one it’s all about the style.

Mercedes’ sets the tone with interiors, and while my test vehicle went with basic black as the dominant color scheme (it is available with optional brown, beige or two-tone color schemes), which imparts a feel of appropriately understated class.

Nappa leather upholstered seats face a redesigned dash crowned by digital displays (two of them on dash and console, each configurable and custom-tailorable as to the info they show) set on ash wood accented, curved surfaces.

The whole effect is wonderful to look at, and impressed everyone I showed the vehicle off to, but the icing on the cake in the E400 test car was the comfort of the first row; capped by my favorite option on the tester – massage seats.

Driver and front seat passenger will love this.

Seriously, up until I climbed into the E400 I would have said the seats in the previously featured BMW 440i were my favorite buckets in any luxury car I have driven; but the offers adjustable back massage of the E has won my heart.

The feature – like almost all onboard function in the E – is engaged and configured through a central controller on the console. This isn’t unusual for most luxury vehicles, you’ll find similar systems in all the premium cars, and while it isn’t as intuitive and straightforward as I want, I will say that like the Mercedes implementation of it (branded as COMAND, all in capitals once again) better than the touchpad of Lexus or the twiddle-and-poke function of BMW’s iDrive module.

Anyway, I’m saying 10 out of 10 for style and comfort throughout the cabin, with a bonus for the LED accent strip that rings the cockpit, which can be tailored according to your mood through the aforementioned Comand module.

Outwardly, you’ll still recognize the E Coupe, despite the company’s insistence that it is ‘all-new’ they haven’t departed too radically from their winning formula, and this is what really works for the car.

The fascia and headlight treatment is new, as are the air intakes and ‘diamond’ grille, and hood has been resculpted with what they call a powerdome bulge added; but the side windows and overall profile are still very similar to the 2017 model year.

It is a beautiful piece of sculpture, no question, but I like the way Benz has kept the outward appearance shy of being ostentatious and show-offy.

Driving the E400 is what really sells the car – from inside the ultra-quiet cabin the flat and stable ride garners approval from passengers in both front and rear seats, and the smoothness of acceleration from the three-litre six meshes so well with the steering feel that it will quickly spoil a driver for anything else.

The nine-speed transmissions fluid shifts are seamless in any of the drive modes, but the E allows you to takeover the shifting with wheel-mounted paddle shifters for those who enjoy the extra feel of being in charge.

All-wheel drive also brings a broader, year-round appeal to the platform, especially if you live in a climate zone where you just know its gonna snow.

I don’t have a lot of criticism of the E400 coupe overall, but for the really obvious:

The coupe body, having just two doors, in my mind makes it a de facto two-seater (its not, of course, the car will hold four people after all, but if you regularly haul more than one passenger you will want to check out the proper sedan version of the E-Class)

And then of course, the matter of price. My test model came with a sticker cost of $85,600, which included a number of option packages that brought it up to full luxury status.

You can pay a lot less and still come away with a pretty decent car from less prestigious brands, but hey, you can pay a lot more, too; compare it with a number of other similarly dressed-for-success autos from Audi, BMW or Lexus.

2017 Mercedes-Benz GLC 43 Coupe

2017GLC-fb

You know, I though this was going to be such a great shot – it was taken during the solar eclipse last month – but we didn’t really get much of the effect at this latitude.

Well, before we go any further, let us address the most obvious aspect of this vehicle: yes, it does look a lot like a BMW X6. Like, quite a lot. It kind of reminds me of when Honda reintroduced the Insight after a lengthy absence, and it looked startlingly like its main competitor, Toyota’s Prius.

There are a few fundamental differences, though, particularly in the dimensions – the X6 is longer, slightly taller and over 200 kg heavier than my test vehicle this time out – between Mercedes’ GLC Coupe and it’s fellow countryman.

The GLC Coupe is a relatively new addition to Benz’s expanding fleet of light-duty premium crossovers, and brings everything you expect from a luxury car with its catchy combination of visual appeal and capable underpinnings.IMG_7122

This one especially, may I add, for my test vehicle is the apex of the model, a loaded and tricked-out trim sporting AMG trappings and a suite of option packages that push the price and the power to levels befitting its segment.2017GLC-5a

Properly described as the AMG 43 GLC 4MATIC Coupe in the company product info, this is one frisky package of horsepower and sport-oriented tuning, riding on an all-wheel drive platform.

(That’s what ‘4MATIC’ means in Mercedes-talk, for those of you who may not know, sort of like VW’s designation for awd is ‘4MOTION’. Both companies enjoy capitalizing their terms as well, for whatever reason).

The key mechanical specs boast a potential output of 362 hp and 384 lb-ft. of torque, strapped to a 9-speed transmission (which they also spell in all-caps as the 9G-TRONIC).

The power comes on strong when you hit the pedal, the twin-turbo 3.0 litre never left me feeling let down or underwhelmed, regardless of the drive mode I was in. Which was mostly eco-mode, mind you, as the GLC 43 is not a fuel sipper (as you might deduce) and putting it into Sport Plus will have it gulping a hefty amount of the premium gasoline it demands.

Of course, as a Mercedes the GLC is as much about the interior as the performance; and it brings a cockpit worthy to stand alongside the company’s sedans.

Heated front (and rear) seats are upholstered in leather, as is the dash make the vehicle a nice place to just sit and take in the ambience in the cabin. An optional Burmester stereo system provides studio-quality sound, as good as any I’ve heard in any vehicle in this class; and the acoustic glass windows make the GLC a great environment to spend time; whether in city traffic or on a highway drive.

Ride comfort should be a given in a vehicle like this, and my 43 coupe didn’t disappoint. In any of the drive modes, including Sport Plus (which stiffens things up appreciably), the air-suspension system absorbed bumps and pavement flaws much more ably, and less jarringly, than many vehicles I driven in similar conditions.GLC-speaker

Partially contributing to the GLC’s terrain-friendliness may be the twenty-inch wheels that this one came with; a great looking set of two-tone, spoked rims that are part of the basic package when you start shopping for this particular model.

However, it is the options and packages that compete the experience with this high-end crossover. Sure, it drives the price up; but hey, we’re all millionaires here, right Gentle Reader?

Anyway, a brief rundown of the packages goes like this:

IMG_7112

For any of you who haven’t been in Mercedes products in the last few years, it is this touchpad/controller apparatus that will take the most getting used to. Beautiful piece of industrial design, though, aye?

The AMG Night Package, Intelligent Drive package, Premium Package and Premium Plus package, combined with standalone options (a great looking blue metallic paint job, red-stitched leather upholstery and AMG carbon fibre trim) added the better part of ten grand to the bottom line.

So the takeaway here is, buyers in this particular market probably won’t be left wanting, and they probably won’t be gobsmacked by the MSRP (let’s face it, you can easily get a similar Audi, Range Rover or Porsche product up to this price), and if they are already owners of any of the rest of the Mercedes-Benz sedan family, the esoteric controls and touch-pad user interface won’t require any new learning on their part either.

My tested model, a AMG 43 GLC 4MATIC Coupe comes in at 79,830 as driven.

2017 Mercedes-Benz E 300 4MATIC

17E300-11This is the time of year that makes having AWD on you luxury car worthwhile. Up here in our delightful Edmonton home (the Paris of the Prairies™) the weather turned foul and a really eye-watering wind blew with it shifting snakes of snow, all over the gosh-darn place.

I had an E Class the week it all began, and right away appreciated it 4MOTION powertain as kept all four wheels under strict electronic management. The best thing about a well-nannied setup like the one in my test Benz is that its constant intervention keeps a driver from making a lot of the fool maneuvers we all mock when we see some lightweight who forgot how to drive in snow.17E300-9

Anyway, my point is, it kept me out of trouble during my time in the car, and allowed for a relaxed frame of mind to enjoy what Benz is all about: a really sweet interior.

My fine sedan, a 2017 E300 (and I should mention that there are two E sedans, the other is the E400, bigger engine) is the tenth generation of the marque, touted by Mercedes as being simultaneously the most technologically-saturated, highest tech yet.

And seriously, the company provided a .pdf that, if printed out and laid end-to-end, would stretch from here to the surface of the Sun; so rather than put us both through that, dear Reader, I’ll just abbreviate my favorites.

The keyless start (or KeylessGo, as the company calls it), along with engine stop/start are a couple of features I like in any car, the large screen atop the center console has variable display modes for every onboard function, and Benz claims to have simplified the operation of their central-command pad. And you know, that may be 17E300-7true, but I still find the mouselike, large-knob-and-palm-pad arrangement to be, uh, not super intuitive; and certainly not less distracting.

17E300-5

Seriously, I love the lighted accent along the lower dash in the 2017 Mercedes-Benz E 300 sedan

It is a beautiful looking controller, though, as is everything inside the E300 cabin. The speaker grilles, the buttons, the layout and lighting are ready for any museum of modern art display. An illuminated strip rings the dash and door panels in a wonderfully understated piece of cabin accenting that makes the car an even more atmospheric drive at night.Comfortable seats and driver’s position I take for granted in any Mercedes product, and the adjustment range should accommodate most anyone. The ride is also typically Benz, seamless and smoothly quiet in any of the drive modes.

The E 300 runs the smaller of the engine options, with a 2.0L powerplant that certainly didn’t disappoint or leave me wanting more. Of course, I didn’t get too ‘dynamic’ with the car in my time in it (because of the snow o the roads, you will recall) but really, the potential output (241 horse, 273 lb.-ft. torque) can’t be called underpowered.

17E300-3

The main controller takes some getting used to, like many similar premium-car systems. I wouldn’t say I like it better than Lexus’ Remote Touch, but I wouldn’t say I like it less.

Overall, though, the E sedan is all about looking good and dropping hints of status. Fitting into the Benz family between the C Class and stratospheric S, the car brings the feel of a luxury lifestyle; despite any esoteric eccentricities (or maybe because of them – perhaps it makes the car seem all the more exotic).

 

Now, enjoy the specs on the specific vehicle I drove, go ahead and check out the (very) long list of standard features.E_300_4MATIC_Sedan_2017-WDDZF4KBXHA033918 (1)

Bottom line on this particular collection of premium build quality and options:Screen shot 2017-01-25 at 2.33.15 PM

 

 

2016 Mercedes Metris

It isn’t the first cargo van from the luxury manufacturer – the Metris joins its larger brother the Sprinter in the Mercedes lineup this year.Metris4

Smaller and not as tall as the well-known Sprinter, Metris seeks to compete with similar working vehicles (Ford’s Transit 150 and the Nissan NV are the first ones that pop to mind) for the hearts and minds and fleets of people who need a versatile and customizable hauler for serious business. This is not your ‘family van’ right here.

I got the chance to tool around in a tester model last week – not quite the entry-level Metris, but pretty close to base; and it makes a case for itself as one to be considered for businesses and trades people, with solid underpinnings and voluminous cargo capacity inside a highly customizable space.

An interesting thing with the Metris is it is one of the few in its class to employ a small four-cylinder powerplant (and maybe the only one, the NV and Transit use V6 engines). Boasting a potential 208 horses, and 258 lb.-ft of torque that apparently comes on at a low 1300 rpm; the turbo two-litre lurks beneath the short hood of the Metris and dispenses its power with all the smoothness we expect from a Mercedes product.

The vehicle drives and handles well, of course, as it benefits from the same stability control systems that keep the much taller and top-heavy Sprinter stable and upright, and it corners superbly (for its size and shape) and holds up well on bumpy roads with a comfortable-yet-solid suspension.Metris12

The engine felt good and fully capable to me during my time in it, accelerating effortlessly and predictably; but I’ll be honest with you – I didn’t have a load in the vehicle, at least nothing that would put it to a torture test.

The company claims the Metris is capable of towing up to 2250 kilos, which may have led to different impressions; but I don’t have anything to tow, nor do I have 1135 kg of tools or toys to stress-test the stated cargo bed payload capacity.

No indeed, my test Metris was a stripped down two-seater with nothing in the back but a vast empty cube of 5270 cubic litres of highly configurable space.

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The front seats – the only seats – are comfortable (and heated) Benz-quality perches with drop-down armrests that face a dash that will be familiar to fans of the German manufacturer’s cars; ditto the steering wheel.

With my test model being near-entry level, there were lots of blanks where buttons would go (buttons that would operate things like a navigation module, for example), but there was a digital speed-display option among the choices on the information display.

Metris11

This is an interesting feature of the Metris – the filler door can’t be opened or closed without opening the driver’s side door.

Paddle shifts adorn the steering wheel, for use with the manual-shift mode the automatic transmission offers (there also comfort and eco modes), and while the steering column is tilt-able, it does not telescope.

Overall, there’s a lot of high points in the new-for2016 Metris, but let me offer a few of the more salient lows:

I know I keep saying my test-Metris was nearly a base model, unadorned as it was, but the thing is, it wasn’t completely the entry-level.

Building on the starting MSRP of $33,900, this one included nearly three grand worth of packages, and frankly still came up wanting in a couple of key areas.

Even with the Cold Weather package, Convenience package, Lighting package and Basic Window Package (and you really want this, trust me, without the side and rear windows, all-round visibility from the driver’s seat is not good, as you can imagine) and some stand-alone options; the van still lacked a couple of things I figure are must-haves in this modern age.

No backup camera, for example. No blind-spot monitors or parking sensors either. Seems like a stark omission to not include these extremely useful features at some level of the packaging that has already been added to the one pictured here; especially at a price of $40,485 (with freight and delivery charges).Metris3

©2016 Wade Ozeroff

 

Mercedes-Benz StartUp semi finals

I went to a fashion show last Tuesday (April 17), part of Benz’s nationwide contribution to Canadian talent, what they’re calling “StartUp”.

Not so much because I am a fashion-conscious individual, quite the opposite in fact (hell, you should see how I dress), but because I genuinely get a kick out of the whole fashion world.

A million years ago, at some newspaper I worked at, I got to do a lot of shoots with a really great editor named Tammy Platzke.

Shows, studio, location stuff; and all of it was fun. Visually entertaining, and with great images at the end; a result of the sheer amount of dedicated (albeit weird! and hey bubba, fashion people are unusual) effort by the many professionals involved.

Loved it ever since. I’ll flat out admit that I don’t just like Vanity Fair for the articles, I loves me a styled photo; with tailored lighting and groomed professionals and the whole sort of contrived, fantasy atmosphere that you get in the industry.

It’s eight flavors of fun, and it was a chance to try out this great new lens I got with a position right at the mouth of the catwalk, yeah the catwalk baby; as designers from across Canada draped really tall women in their wares and sent them out looking good in front of a panel of judges.

Here’s a gallery of it (at greatly reduced rez) – the last photos are of the semi-final round’s winner, a down-home Edmonton girl named Malorie Urbanovitch (she’s the shorter one).