EcoRun 2019: Alberta Edition

Calgary

We were yahoo’d properly into the spirit of the town, and given big, funny hats befitting our stature by the city’s Director of Business Development, Greg Newton, down at the Stampede grounds as the 2019 edition of EcoRun came to a close.

Stampede didn’t officially start for another week, but around here they take this festival/rodeo seriously, and start the party early. Our hotel downtown was buzzing with people in similar hats to ours, and the atmosphere decidedly celebratory.

However, just as the speechifying was about to begin, with the announcements of who among us had achieved the best fuel economy numbers – and would thus rule over us all with their prize, the coveted ‘Green Jersey’ (similar to an Oscar, except it isn’t rigged, ha ha), that’s when the weather turned on us.

The sky cracked open, and blasted down upon us some truly biblical rain, which is one thing; but it was when the thunder started and the power in our building went out that our group abandoned Stampede Park and ran to the buses back to downtown, sheltered from the monsoon (somewhat) by our big, funny hats.

But wait. I’m formulating this tale poorly – stories aren’t supposed to start at the end. Let’s back it up a couple of days, to the beginning of this 8th installment of AJAC’s EcoRun:

Edmonton

We kicked it off in Edmonton, down by the river at Louise McKinney Park. Mayor Don Iveson joined Minister of Natural Resources Amarjeet Sohi and Suncor VP Dean Wilcox on a stage with several of the vehicles to open the drive.

(And hey, for a complete list of vehicles that were involved in the event, and their fuel scores, scroll down to the bottom of the page).

EcoRun Chair David MIller (left) opens the event along with Mayor Don Iveson, Minister of Natural Resources Amarjeet Sohi and Suncor VP Dean Wilcox Photo courtesy John Walker/AJAC

You don’t need me to run down what the annual EcoRun is all about – in a nutshell it’s a demonstration of vehicles from a number of manufacturers’ most fuel efficient products. Not everything needs to be an EV or a hybrid to enter; we had a diesel-powered Chevy Colorado in the mix along with a couple of gasoline-only Mazda3s (both sedan and hatchback, and one an AWD to boot).

Here’s some links to some past history and overview of the event and its intent.

Getting back to the story: I jumped into a Toyota RAV4 and drove out to our first destination (and charge point for the electric vehicles):

Red Deer

I rolled into the ‘Deer with an average of 5.5L/100km, which is actually .5 under the NRCanada rating for the RAV, and pretty decent for an AWD crossover. It underscores another important point, too; almost every vehicle entered in this year’s run actually beat the projected ‘official’ mileage figures – some by a little and some by a lot. Check out the results for the Hyundai Elantra and the Colorado, for example!

Red Deer isn’t just famous for being the birthplace of Wade Ozeroff, either, there’s a sports museum on the outskirts of the city where we pulled in for a look while the EV’s recharged. The recharging can take a couple of hours, even with 240v power, so the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame is a good place to kill time, and hear a few words from one of the big sponsors of the EcoRun, ATCO’s Francois Blouin.

Drumheller

I switched to a Volvo for the next leg, an XC60 T8 for the drive from Red Deer to Drumheller. Great vehicle, incidentally; I love Volvo’s interiors in any of their current vehicle lineup. I got less-stellar fuel economy on this leg of the run, though, coming in at 6.7L per 100km.

But hey! Drumheller! I haven’t been to the area since I was a little kid, and they’ve got way more stuff at the excellent Royal Tyrrell Museum. I totally recommend it – there’s dozens if not hundreds of dinosaur skeletons (and prehistoric mammals). The facility is awesome, as is the Badlands countryside around it.

 Calgary

It was in Drumheller that I swapped the Volvo for a fully electric vehicle, a Kia Niro. And here’s an important point: EVs have become much better at predicting, accurately, their range. When they unhooked my test car from the charging station, it claimed to have a range of 220 kilometers.

I have been in earlier-generation electric vehicles where this claim meant nothing (which is where the whole ‘range anxiety’ comes in – a car starts off saying it has lots of range and then the estimate plummets when you pull onto the highway in a headwind, and then suddenly you’re worried about not making it home).

Not the case with the Niro, though. The drive to Cowtown was 141 km, and pulled into the hotel downtown with 80 km of range still left in the battery, according to its info display.

Longview

Photo courtesty AJAC/John Walker

Longview, AB isn’t just the home of country music icon Ian Tyson, it is also the base of one of the finest Jerky stores in our fine province. I picked some up for the rest of the trip, and totally vouch for the quality of their fine product.

That aside, the trip to Longview from Calgary (this is into the second day of the Run) allowed another hybrid from Toyota to stand out – the Corolla Hybrid.

What made it remarkable in particular was that this was only leg of the event where I drove with a passenger in any of the vehicles. A delightful woman named Andrea from NRCan joined me for the trip, which was great timing because the Corolla didn’t a navigation system and I am absolutely terrible at directions.

Indeed, the only thing worse than a car with no nav is a car with a navigation system that gets confused and does stupid things like try to send you the wrong way down a one-way, or keeps making you drive across the bridge over the river unnecessarily. So it was good to have someone to read the map directions, especially since all the highways to Longview seem to be called Hwy 22. Andrea can attest to this.

Anyway, the point is, the Corolla hybrid came in under the official economy estimate with two of us in the car (I got 3.9km/100km versus the stated 4.5 from the company) and that was including me getting lost for a while on the way out of downtown.

Banff/Canmore

Coming into the home stretch, Andrea abandoned me in Longview (perhaps in favor of a more competent media geek, one who doesn’t get lost, I dunno), and I hopped daintily into another Toyota product – one of my favorites: the Prius!

And not just any Prius, either, but the company’s new, all-wheel drive model. It turned in stellar mileage on the drive from Longview to Banff/Canmore yielding 3.7L/100km which is incredible for an AWD car, and full litre below the official economy numbers. Also, this one had a nav system, and a really good one at that.

Calgary Redux

In summation: that was about that, my gentle friends. My last push of the EcoRun was in a Nissan Altima that took me into Calgary (admittedly, it was pretty much a straight run down the highway) with a result almost two km under the official FE number, at 5.8L/100km.

I could have done better, too, but the Altima’s nav system got confused and kept trying to make me drive over to the wrong side of the river and I got mad at it and was perhaps mashing the gas a little hard as I drove ‘round and ‘round in downtown traffic.

Actual photo of David MIller, outgoing EcoRun Chair and a pretty right-on guy.

And now we’re back to the start of this tale, y’all, with a bunch of really good-lookin’ men and women fleeing the Stampede grounds deluge in big funny hats.

Don’t worry, though, we took over the bar at the hotel for the closing ceremonies, conducted under makeshift conditions by longtime EcoRun Chair, David Miller. The poignant touch on the evening is that will be Miller’s last turn as Chair of the event after 8 years – a great guy with absolutely first-rate planning skills who consistently pulls together the wonderful showcase of fuel-efficient and alternative-fuel vehicles. I can’t imagine how much work must go into putting this spectacle on, primarily done by Miller and the event Logistics Manager, the excellent Jim Koufis.

My big funny hat is off to them, and to the Alberta edition of the AJAC EcoRun!

You can check out the results below for the results of all the entries, there really isn’t a loser in the bunch:

 

 

2018 Crashed Ice in Edmonton

Well, that was pretty entertaining.

We took in Redbull’s Crashed Ice event on its Edmonton stop this past weekend, the last stop on a globe spanning tour that has seen this Ice Cross Downhill World Championships stop in cities from Finland to France to the US and Canada – in fact, the race was in La Sarre Quebec before bring the action to Edmonton, the final stop on the tour.

I confess I wasn’t familiar with the sport before we attended the Edmonton; but it isn’t too hard to get your brain around the concept, it’s a downhill skate race over a course that looks pretty extreme.

The skaters go off in heats of up to four, and rocket down an elaborate elevated course with a heavily iced surface, first one to the finish line wins. Sounds straightforward enough, right? But its easier said than done when you’re traveling at speeds of up to 80km/h.

No question this qualifies as an extreme sport, my friends, and I have nothing but respect for all the athletes who made it to the Edmonton final round.

(Incidentally, the overall winners were crowned here Saturday night, and American Amanda Trunzo took the honors in the women’s division, and Canada’s Scott Croxall won the men’s.

The full results can be seen here on Redbull’s Crashed Ice page

But it wasn’t just about the races themselves, this was a full-on, get-out-and-enjoy the spectacle in downtown E-town, where the streets around the Shaw center were closed off and people marched down Grierson hill to a site filled with a really decent crowd around the ice-cross track.

Adding another level of interest, this is the first year that Hyundai Motors has partnered with Redbull for the Crashed Ice show, the Korean manufacturer is using the extreme sport to showcase a couple of their more extreme vehicles – the newest generation of pumped-up Velosters.

The three door hatchbacks are being groomed for rally sport with the introductions of the 2019 Veloster Turbo and their halo hatch, the Veloster N

The Turbo was on display up at street level, showing off for the crowd with a sporty leatherclad interior and matte paint-job on it that looked pretty appealing.

This one boasts 201hp 195 lb.-ft. of torque (and I’m told it will be available with a manual transmission as well), but the monster Veloster, the N, was strictly on display at Crashed Ice.

Mirko Lahti of Finland, Alex Schrefels of the United States, Jesse Sauren of Finland and Joni Saarinen of Finland compete during the Junior Competition at the tenth and final stage of the ATSX Ice Cross Downhill World Championship at the Red Bull Crashed Ice in Edmonton, Canada on March 9, 2018.

Here it is up on a pedestal in front of one of the first drops on the ice course, looking sporty; and when it hits the streets and showrooms this car will really be bringing the performance.

A 2.0L turbocharged engine pushing 275 horses and 260 lb.-ft. of torque, riding on an electronically controlled suspension and offering a selection of driving modes tuned for track performance; with distinctive body sculpting and detailing to differentiate this top of the line model from the Turbo and other members of the Veloster lineup.

The N won’t be available until later in the year, so this is our first look at it, but we’ll be hoping to take a drive in this little monster when it arrives.

And on a less adrenalizing but perhaps more practical note, Hyundai had their newest urban-oriented utility vehicle on hand as well – here’s the 2018 Kona at their display in downtown Edmonton.

Now if you’re like me, gentle reader, you probably realize that while you may want the Veloster, the Kona is the one that makes a better case for purchase as all-round everyday vehicle for all seasons.

And that’s about it. Having seen this year’s Crashed Ice competition, I’m a fan; and having seen Edmonton’s support for the event and the good time had by everyone I met there I’d bet the event’s sponsors and promoters are fans of us too.

Check out the Youtube here:

 

 

 

2018 Hyundai Elantra GT Sport

I do love the compact hatchbacks, my friends.

A 5-door hatch is the most useful body style for a car, especially that can be the only vehicle for a family, or even an angry loner such as myself.

The utility of the big rear door for cargo and groceries speaks for itself, and seating for up to five people is a plus; but put that together in a sporty hot-hatch body with a direct-injection gasoline turbo engine and a six-speed manual gearbox and we have a car that is actually a lot of fun in addition to practical.

Such is the case with this one – and here: check out our Youtube video of the  2018 Hyundai Elantra GT, in Sport trim.

Hyundai is pretty proud of this latest iteration of their well-received compact, and they tout it as being “all-new” for 2018

It’s not just the design of the body – and check it out, the Elantra has become progressively more attractive and aerodynamic this year, and gained a new and better-looking grille.

The company credits their new focus on ‘European styling’ for the improvements, which is where the car was developed and tested, and they also state that it is built with 53% more Advanced High Strength Steel (from their own subsidiary, Hyundai Steel, which they are extremely proud of)

That’s double the high strength steel used in the outgoing model, adding extra rigidity to the new Elantra GT’s chassis which Hyundai says further enhances noise insulation, collision safety, and the car’s driving and handling performance.

And sure, I’ll go along with that. The Elantra GT is highly maneuverable and genuinely fun to drive. The one we’re looking at here, as I say, is the Sport model, which gets Hyundai’s 1.6L turbo powerplant.

The engine has an output of 201 hp and 195 lb.-ft. of torque, which is actually more torque – available at lower rpms – than Honda’s Civic SI, but hey, we shouldn’t turn this into a horse-measuring contest here.

Sure you can get more get-up-and-go in Ford’s Focus ST or the VW Golf GTi, but really, we must stop and ask ourselves, how much power does the average driver require, for average daily use?

201 is way more than adequate, at least for any kind of legal driving, and it got me up to speed good and quick in any situation where I poured it on.

Now, you can get the GT with an automatic (a 7-speed dual clutch transmission), but for the purists, the six-speed manual is great. A short throw shifter that feels great to use, and helps bring the performance-oriented feel to daily driving.

So with a package that offers great flexibility for cargo an passenger handling, as much power the average driver is ever likely to need and a generally good looking vehicle body, its hard to pick at the 2018 GT Sport’s faults.

It isn’t even significantly expensive when compared to its major rivals (like the aforementioned Civic Si), and in fact comes in a lot lower than either the Golf or Focus hot-hatches; and I want to mention here that Hyundai has gained a lot of ground in terms or reliability and longevity; as demonstrated by the Consumer reports rating of not just this but all of their lineup.

The NRCanada fuel economy rating for the GT is 10.7L/100 km, which, while not stellar, isn’t really too bad for a turbo gasoline engine intended to be sporty and fun, and here’s the thing:

If you love the looks and the layout, but don’t need the turbo, the Elantra GT is also available with a 2.0 litre non-turbo engine and starts in the low twenties.

Our GT Sport tester moves that up a bit, with this one coming in at a Canadian MSRP of a little over 28K