2020 Toyota Corolla Hybrid

 

Gimme hybrids all day long, that’s my new motto.

That is my maxim, my mantra, my short, pithy statement expressing a general truth or rule of conduct, my thing-that-I-say.

Not just because of the lower tailpipe emissions and overall level of quietness, but of course because I don’t have to jump to the gas-pumps as often, to refuel.

Thus it is that I love the latest of Toyota’s hybrid lineup to make it over to Canada – the 2020 Corolla. (It is interesting to note, too, that the company has a really huge variety of hybrid powertrain vehicles available in overseas markets, from minivans to subcompacts like this cool Yaris I drove in the Netherlands back in 2015).

The gas/electric Corolla combines a 1.8L engine with the nickel-metal hydride battery pack that forms Toyota’s Hybrid Synergy Drive system, adding two electric motors to the mix. Combined output from the system is rated at 121 hp and 105 lb.-ft. of torque.

The transmission is a two-speed CVT, and the Corolla brings the fairly industry-standard drive mode choices of Eco, Sport and (default) Normal, along with the ability to run it under purely electric power (for short distances). The car will also switch into pure EV mode even at pretty decent speeds when the system senses it can get by that way.

Another interesting feature unique the Hybrid version is that 15-inch wheels are standard issue on the car. While this may not attract attention they way larger wheels found on some of the competition, consider it from a cost-of-ownership perspective – i.e., fifteen-inch tires are going to be less expensive to replace than a set of 17” low-profile rubber.

The whole Corolla platform has been updated for 2020, now running on the company’s Global Architecture platform, and the Hybrid benefits from all of that, but rather than bore you with a litany about the updates, I’ll just post this link straight to the horse’s mouth, so to speak. After all, Mindful Reader, you don’t come to wozeroff.com to see a retyped press release, you come here for a drawing of a pregnant walrus. We’ll get to that later.

Suffice to say, the vehicle is easy to get used to and easy to get comfortable in. The upgraded interior of my test car gave me ‘Softex’ leather seating surfaces and a heated steering wheel, Apple CarPlay and an 8-way adjustable power driver’s seat.

The Corolla handles very well for its segment, steering feel and brake response were very good, and I never felt I lacked power, despite the relatively low horse-and-torque figures. Putting it in Sport mode when I wanted all the available power boosted the accelerator response noticeably, and the little sedan now looks as good as it should, thanks to an exterior makeover that finally sees Corolla getting a better appearance from all angles, and a lowered stance for curb appeal.

The real takeaway from my time in the car, however, is here:

Yes, that’s right. I actually beat the company’s stated fuel economy figure (which is 4.4L/100km) in combined city/hwy driving, and I wasn’t trying particularly hard; although I did predominantly use it Eco mode, for a week of (mostly) city driving.

So overall, it’s all good, right? Well, sure, but with a couple of caveats:

Obviously, it isn’t a sports car. Performance is quite acceptable, but if you’re looking for adrenalin-filled thrills, you need to look elsewhere.

Also – and again, obviously – this is compact car. The rear seats are best for smaller people (although I must note that the Corolla rear seats have more head and legroom than the Honda Civic sedan, and more legroom than a Kia Forte).

I had no issue with room and space in the front seats, and I am 6’2” and roughly 190 lbs (of solid, rippling muscle), but if you have been – how shall I say this – blessed with the physique of a pregnant walrus, you’d be better advised to consider something larger.

A Hyundai Palisade, perhaps. If you’re googling that, remember that ‘Palisade’ has only one L in the name.

Oh, and the overall quiet of the vehicle is something to be aware of. Particularly when you’re running in purely electric mode, the Corolla Hybrid makes almost no sound; and it is important to be conscious that pedestrians and cyclists can’t hear you coming up behind them.

Heck, you could sneak up on a dog with this car in EV mode.

That’s about it for ‘cons’ though, even the price isn’t going to scare anyone. The vehicle starts at $24,790 for a base model, and the one used to for my story here added two grand for a Premium Package option, which brought things like the heated, leather steering wheel, 8-way power driver’s seat, heated rear seats, leather seating and wireless smartphone charging and still only came to $28,566 (including freight and PDI).

 

 

2018 Prius Prime

My new favorite PHEV, right here:

We have a saying out here in Edmonton, a pithy witticism of homespun folksy wisdom “What the heck happened to our fall?” because although we do get a very nice autumn, the beauty only lasts a couple of days and then the wind kicks up and blows all the leaves off the trees and everything looks like a backdrop from a Tim Burton movie.

Thus it was, in the final days of October, that I was delighted to head for Ontario, where the trees are still adorned in colors; and also where the testing days for the Canadian Car of the Year are held.

Fully recharged in about 2 1/2 hours on a Level 2 charger. The Hilton in Ajax has a bank of chargers for both regular EVs and Tesla vehicles.

There were a lot of nice vehicles at the CCOTY event (held at Canadian Tire Motorsports Park, formerly called Mosport) but I tell ya, one of my favorites wasn’t an entry in the contest this year – it was this one right here: Toyota’s Prius plugin hybrid.

I had the chance to put some time in a Prime, getting from Pearson airport to the city of Ajax, where the voting journalists make their home for the four days of the event, and commuting to the CTMP site.

Overall, I put about 427 km on the Prius, driving to the site every day; mostly highway kilometers – and this is where a hybrid vehicle saves the day. The Prime will run purely as an electric vehicle for as long as it can (and the Prime has more battery capacity than the regular model Prius) and after it runs out of charge switches to operating as a regular hybrid car, with its gasoline engine in combination with the (dual) electric motors.

The basics are this: the Prime employs a 1.8L gasoline powerplant, which combined with the electric motors yields a net output of 121 horsepower. It’s a front-wheel drive four seater (2+2 configuration) with a CVT transmission, all rolled up in a compact, hatchback body that sports a little more style than the regular Prius.

While the horsepower numbers don’t sound impressive, I never found the car let me down. It handled merging and passing on the highways without causing me a lot of angst or apprehension, and at one point I managed to fit four full-sized adults into it without anyone feeling cramped.

The car is comfortable enough in the driver’s position, with ample overhead space – oh, and hey! – heated seats and a heated steering wheel make for a welcoming environment on cold mornings.

My test car, in a trim level they call Prime Upgrade with an additional Technology package option, gave it a full-featured suite of electronic conveniences with an upgraded audio system and a heads-up display that projected all the pertinent information.

Prime models also get a bigger information screen on the center stack, and satellite navigation system (which is a lifesaver for people like me, I don’t know the area around Toronto/Ajax well at all). Indeed, without the nav system I would probably still be driving up and down the 401).

As for the economy case, even though I was mostly operating in hybrid mode (the fully electric range got used up fairly quickly during highway driving, and the Prime will automatically switch to using the gas engine), I still ended with fuel consumption of only 3.9L/100 km, which actually beats the stated FE number from NRCanada.

When I was just running short distances around Ajax, my fuel consumption was zero, as long I kept it charged; and the hotel I was at (a Garden Inn) provided a bank of Level 2 chargers for guests; which would fully recharge the battery pack in about two-and-a-half hours.

Prime is the only member of the Prius family I hadn’t driven before (or it was, anyway, if you’re following the action from the LA auto, you’ve seen the company introduce and AWD version of the car) and has made itself my personal favorite.

The one seen here, with its Tech package option, came to $38,570

2018 Toyota Prius Tech

Roight. By now, with the world-changing vehicle in its fourth incarnation, you probably don’t need an explanation of what the Prius is, or the basics of hybrid cars; so we can just go straight to our look at this 2018 iteration of Toyota much loved-and-lauded ecofriendly compact.

Notice, though, that this one is the regular Prius, the latest generation of the original five-door passenger friendly runabout, but there are now four models within the family to choose from (you’ve also got the smaller Prius C, the larger Prius V, and the plug-in hybrid Prius Prime).

This one here is your basic Prius, but in the Technology trim.

The Tech model starts at about three grand over the base buy-in, and adds a whack of desirable functions (not all of which fall under my definition of ‘tech’, but we can talk about that some other time, eh?)

What you get with the Tech trim is: a blind spot monitor system (with

rear cross traffic alert, which I always make a point of mentioning is one my favorite safety features in any vehicle), an auto-dimming rear view mirror , rain sensing wipers, and Toyota’s clever ‘intelligent clearance sonar’ and parking assist – whereby the car will parallel park itself.

Another thing you get with the Tech trim is a heads-up display, which is great because it keeps all the important info (like your digital speed display) right in easy eyesight. One thing I always disliked about Prius was the way the info was displayed on the center stack, where you have to shift your gaze away from the road. The center info panel is still there, of course, with its 7” screen providing more detailed information.

My Tech test car also provided a decent driver environment, with heated, 8-way adjustable seat (the seating is branded as something called ‘Softex’). The seating is indeed passably comfortable all around, front headroom is good (the rear less so, frankly, so you don’t want to be too tall if you’re going to ride back there all day).

The cabin impression in the test vehicle was ‘dark’ overall, with mainly black surfaces and upholstery occasionally interrupted with white plastic molding and the blue accent of the shift knob.

Outwardly, the car has become more aerodynamic and dare I say stylish with the redesign – still polarizing, mid you, I got a variety of reactions to its appearance – in a marked departure from the Prius shape we’ve all gotten used to.

Not a bad looking little auto, in my opinion; and certainly still distinctive; if less slick-and-sporty than they may have been going for.

But the point of the Prius remains fuel efficiency and lower tailpipe emissions, and the consumption rating of 4.5L/100 km (NRCan number) is the biggest driving force in the car’s world-beating sales numbers.

I’ll confess I didn’t get that during my time in this one, but as you can see in the photos, I drove it during Edmonton winter; so the vehicle was working harder in the snow as well as running the heater the whole time, which has an impact.

As a bit of trivia, the Prius used in the EcoRun event in 2016 ended up at 3.2L/100 km (which works out to 73.5 mpg in US gallons)

The power train is a reliable 1.8 litre gasoline engine, paired with the company’s Hybrid Synergy Drive electric motor system. It’ll output a combined 121 horsepower (and 98 hp from just the gas engine alone) and 105 lb-ft of torque which, while not big numbers by today’s standards, is more than enough to get the Prius up to speed, and responsive enough that I never find myself nervous or apprehensive about merging and passing in general use.

You know going in that you’re not buying a sports car, and I doubt anyone is confused about that, but instead a thoroughly capable and competent car that delivers daily usefulness backed up by years of customer satisfaction and near-universal praise from institutions like Consumer Reports.

Pricing starts at the 30K level, and my Prius Tech tester came with a sticker of $34,637.50 and that’s without factoring in any incentives that may be available in your area (I live in Alberta, where there aren’t any incentives for buying hybrids or electric vehicles; and am not sure what the situation is in BC, ON or Quebec).

2018 Lexus NX300h

At Edmonton’s Aviation Museum

Hybridized and Urbanized

Winter’s never the greatest time for a hybrid vehicle to show off their superior fuel economy – everyday driving is harder work in snow, and running the heater (and heated seats and steering wheel, in this case) force the gasoline engine to be in use most of the time.

Nevertheless, I ended a week of driving with figures not too far off the stated FE (which is a combined city/highway consumption of 7.5L/100 km, I got 8.8 during a freezing cold week with a fair amount of snow) in our test subject – the 2018 NX300h.

Here’s a crossover that is riding the wave of popularity that buyers have bestowed on the small-ish utility vehicle segment, and bringing with it a Lexus level of premium build quality in addition to an economical low-emissions powertrain.

As you know, Lexus is the luxury arm of Toyota Motors, the company that has done more than anyone to bring hybrid vehicles to the masses (check back next week, when we’ll be looking at the latest version of their original marketplace gamechanger, the Prius), and in terms of size and configuration (and powertrain) you could think of the NX as being the more elite version of the company’s ultra popular RAV4.

Fitting into the Lexus utility lineup between the recently announced UX and the larger and better known RX models, the NX has been around for about four years now – long enough that it has received a bit of a refresh for the 2018 model year, though not a complete model change.

New front fascia and a sleekening of the grille and front bumpers have helped streamline its appearance on approach; and the love-it-or-hate-it ‘spindle’ grille that the vehicle shares with the rest of the Lexus lineup has been incorporated more seamlessly into the overall presentation.

The rear of the NX has had its taillights stretched a bit, the rear bumper has been lowered and widened, the exhaust tips are larger for this year and an underbody spoiler has been added.

Overall, I think the styling changes work in its favor, this is a good-looking machine that manages to stand out on the road without begging for attention in an undignified or gaudy fashion; unlike a number of ‘premium’ compact crossovers that have sprouted up in the expanding segment.

The NX is more about the occupant’s experience inside it than the overall curb appeal, although it does look sweet perched on those eighteen-inch alloy wheels.

Our test car showed off nice upholstery over comfortable seating (the leather even extended to the wrap on the steering wheel), and brought the newly enlarged information screen to the center-dash display (the display has grown three inches from previous models).

Comfort is always one of the strong points in virtually any Lexus, and our NX lived up to expectations with a fully adjustable driver’s seat, decent room overhead in the front row, power tilt-and-telescoping steering column and a heated steering wheel.

Ah, yes indeed. The Remote Touch touchpad. photo courtesy Lexus Canada

Everything is easy to reach and relatively intuitive to operate, but let us draw your attention once again to the interface, which is this touchpad thing here. I find it fiddly and imprecise, to be honest with you, and easy to overshoot the menu items I try to select.

I’ll warn you too, the NX isn’t a huge vehicle. I didn’t find the space bad, but it is noticeably tighter inside than the RX model, and likewise doesn’t offer as much cargo and second-row space.

From a driving perspective, the NX300h boasts a smooth ride and a quiet cabin (although, interestingly, the engine note is reproduced inside the cabin through the vehicle’s sound system speakers, in what the company calls ‘Active Sound Control’. Neat, eh?)

The all-wheel drive system offers a selection of preprogrammed drive modes (Sport, Eco and Normal, as with most of Lexus’ hybrids), and the electric power steering system makes the handling responsive and car-like, overall. Our test car also contained the Lexus Safety System, which brought lane-departure with steering assist.

The Hybrid gets its power from a combination of 2.5L gasoline engine mated to two electric motors, bringing enhanced fuel economy to the NX and a combined output of 194 horsepower and 152 lb.-ft. of torque.

So it isn’t exactly a sports car, but frankly I didn’t feel under-powered during my time in the NX. The transmission is a CVT, as seamless as any in the company’s lineup does a great job of everyday driving (and includes paddle shifters as well).

Lexus’ overall rep speaks for itself, the company dominates in data from consumer advocacy agencies in terms of reliability and build quality.

There’s little to dislike here, as I find with most of the company’s products, and if you find the price a bit on the ‘high’ side (which it is, let’s not lie to each other here, gentle reader),I am going to suggest cross-shopping the NX against the Toyota RAV4 hybrid (coincidentally the 2019 model was just unveiled in New York), which sports virtually the same powertrain in a more budget-conscious machine but at roughly ten grand less.

Here’s the sheet (pdf): NXh 963 – BXWV 682 EN

This one here, though, a 2018 NX300h, came to $55,300 (and that’s before freight and taxes, the full sticker was $57,471.25 CDN)

Don’t forget to check out our video of the NX on Youtube!

 

2018 Toyota Camry XLE Hybrid

I’ve always felt that if I had to make the choice, I would buy a loaded Camry before I would buy an entry level Lexus, and that is certainly the case with this one.

(Incidentally, here is a link to a brief Youtube video with the XLE Hybrid, holding its own on a frigid day here in Edmonton).

A Camry in XLE trim is practically a luxury car, perhaps lacking the brand cachet of Lexus, but consider that this one still comes in about 6K less than the ES300h, which is pretty much the equivalent of the Camry in size and configuration.

The major points of our test Camry are: it’s powered by a 2.5L four-cylinder gasoline engine, which on its own can produce 176 horsepower (and 163 lb.-ft. of torque), but as a hybrid it also adds an electric motor – branded by Toyota as their Hybrid Synergy Drive system – which brings the combined output to a potential 208 hp.

And of course, one of the things about electric power is that the torque comes on at very low rpm, putting the power to the wheels very quickly, especially when the Sport Mode of the Camry hybrid is activated.

I’m not trying to imply that it’s some sort of sports car here, it isn’t, but the vehicle provides ample power and a driving experience that won’t leave the daily driver feeling let down. It comes up to speed promptly and deals with everyday demands admirably whether on the highway or here on the streets of Edmonton.

But where the advantage lies with hybrid vehicles like this is with the increased fuel economy and savings at the pump over the life of the vehicle – Toyota states a combined consumption rating for the Camry Hybrid of 5.2L/100km, although I’ve gone a little over that (this one ended up with 6.0 after about 400 km of mostly city driving, but it has been my observation that cold weather affects the mileage of hybrids by forcing the cars to use the gas engine more).

Inside the 2018 XLE you find comfortable seating and decent headroom, a dash layout where all major controls are easy to find and understand, and a suite of new tech for 2018.

Now, if you watch our Youtube video you may notice that a lot of the apps on my test vehicle come up grayed out, as they aren’t activated for this press car, but regardless, you can see where the apps would be activated through the combination of touch-screen and interface buttons of the Entune 3.0 suite.

Entune is apparently an open source, Linux based system for the communication module – and the 2018 Camry is the first vehicle to get the system.

This Camry XLE also includes a comprehensive set of safety features, my favorites of which are blind-spot monitors and rear cross-traffic detection, and a backup camera that will display an overhead, bird’s eye view of the car.

And while less space-age and futuristic, another feature I like on the Camry XLE is the tire-pressure monitor (which can be displayed as a little graphic on the cluster behind the steering wheel if you cycle through the submenus with the steering-mounted controls) that shows the pressure in each individual tire. I like that so much better than lower-end systems that will only alert you that there is a low tire, but makes you get out and check each one to find it.

So ultimately, there isn’t much to dislike in the all-new Camry Hybrid (and it is ‘all-new’, Toyota says the 2018 shares almost no components with the previous generation).

The Camry is also a top-finalist in the Large Car category for the Canadian Car of the Year, presented by Automobile Journalists Association of Canada

You could pick on the price, I suppose, as the XLE does come in a little higher than competitive hybrids from Korea; and perhaps the appearance – although again, the car looks better in my opinion than the outgoing model.

I wouldn’t call it ugly – it isn’t – but rather what a number of people describe as ‘boring’, but that is of course in the eye of the beholder. (Although, do me a favor and check out that big plastic grille and see what you think).

Our test car here, a pretty complete package as is (there are no options listed for our tester) came with a sticker price of $42,832.50 CDN

2017 Hyundai Ioniq

Ioniq-6You know, there are times I wish a car had a navigation system. No lie, citizen; I’m the kind of person could get lost in a room with one door, and have a poor relationship with geography, even here in my beloved home city.

Combined with my uncannily poor sense of direction it can become a problem, especially if looking for an address in the west end. Or anywhere outside the Henday ring road, frankly.

My test car, a 2017 Hyundai Ioniq, is unable to help me with my tragic, lifelong problem; for it contains no navigation module or app.Ioniq-9

And that right there is my one big problem with my test ride, pretty much everything else I really like.

The Ioniq is positioning itself to be perhaps one of the very few true rivals to Toyota’s ownership of the hybrid segment with its world-beating Prius line, and if the likeable Ioniq holds up in terms of long-term quality it’s a contender

(This nameplate is new, but Korean manufacturers have been putting on a pretty Hybrid show, lately, with well-received offerings like Kia’s Optima Hybrid)Ioniq-2

There are actually three Ioniq models. The test car I used is their straight-up hybrid (which employs a gasoline engine combined with electric motor), but Hyundai also makes an all-electric version and a plug-in hybrid, which allows the battery to be recharged via a power cord module.

My gas-electric tester is the way to go, as far as I am concerned, doing away with the range anxiety of an all-electric car and also not adding another piece of equipment to the mix with an external charger. No matter what the charge level of the battery, it is a comfort knowing that there is a 1.6L internal combustion engine to fall back on.Ioniq-1

Even without considering the science of the whole thing, though the Ioniq functions very well as just a straight-up ‘car’. Better-than-adequate power is delivered by the system (the company claims a combined output of 139hp for the hybrid), made peppier with a Sport mode for the six-speed automatic transmission.

That’s kind of a rarity in itself, eh? A regular transmission on a vehicle like this, where I am accustomed to CVTs on hybrids. And not a bargain-basement tranny, either, but a dual-clutch rig that delivers fast and appropriate shifts (and allegedly rivals a continuously variable transmission for fuel-efficiency as well).

My navigation problem aside, the Ioniq delivered a comprehensive list of inclusions inside the cabin. Heated seats with memory function (and heated steering wheel) are a great creature comfort to have, ditto the LCD screen for the information display on the center stack.

A digital speed display is one of the fields available for between-the-gauges information, always a favorite for me, in any car. The driver’s seating position is made more comfortable with a steering column that allows a better range of tilt-and-telescoping than I have found in Toyota’s Prius.Ioniq-3

In an unrelated similarity to Prius, Hyundai has also split the rear window horizontally with a crosspiece, which has the effect of compromising rear visibility; as do the fat C-pillars of the Ioniq.

This is mitigated by the car’s backup camera, rear cross-traffic detection and blind-spot information systems, though, and I frankly didn’t have any complaints about the visibility during my time in the car.

Headroom up front is good, rear seat roominess is what you would expect in a compact car (i.e., not super, but the seats fold down for additional cargo – which is how they would spend their lives if I owned the car anyway).Ioniq-5

Overall, the Ioniq delivers a genuinely nice compact car that brings great fuel economy (I averaged 4.5L/100 km during my time in it) and styling that is attractive to look at – this isn’t an ugly car, nor is the sheetmetal overly far-out to attract attention just for the sake of it.

Screen shot 2017-05-15 at 10.54.55 AMIt comes with a pricetag that isn’t alienating, either. My test model, a “Blue” trim level Hybrid model, enters at $24,299, although you can push it up over 30K at the high end if you opt for the Limited trim with Tech package.

Which is probably where my navigation system is found.Ioniq-8