2019 Honda Insight

The Insight, one of the original pioneers of hybrid technology, is back again with a third generation.

Honda keeps the Insight nameplate alive, constantly reviving it in new bodies, although he car hasn’t really been visually distinct since the memorable first wave of them that debuted in the late 90s. Remember those? An eclectic little two-door hatchback with covered rear wheel wells (a styling cue that can still be found on the company’s Clarity PHEV) that grabbed attention.

And then it went away for a while before returning for a second generation where, in a peculiar design choice, it was almost identical to Toyota’s Prius, which was at the time the unquestioned champion of hybrid passenger cars. I remember being at the North American launch of the second-gen Insight, and when they unveiled it we of the press all said in unison: “Um, that’s a Prius, dudes”, to which Honda’s engineering team responded “No it isn’t! No it isn’t! It’s totally unique bla bla bla”, which convinced almost no one.

Now the badge is back, as is Honda’s underlying technology – a combination of gas engine and two electric motors – but this time dressed in the body of a Civic.

Because, seriously, that is basically what it is, it is a Civic with a hybrid powertrain. Not that that’s a bad thing, mind you, Civic is one of the most well-known and highly regarded compacts in the world; so if you’re going to look like something it may as well be that.

And here is where I’ll point out that this is, in my opinion, a darn good-looking car.

With dimensions and volumes that are identical to Civic (the sedan version of the Civic, that is, not the cool new hatchback configuration that is also available) and a sticker price that isn’t too much of a premium (especially if you live somewhere that offers incentives for buying a hybrid) this may be the Insight that finally grabs a bigger market share; because the thing is, there isn’t much to dislike about this car.

The Insight I drove recently was a Touring trim (so, the top of the line), and loaded up the car with all the tech and driver assistance that Honda can pile on:

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Most of it is accessed through the touchscreen on the center console (and, now that the company has gone back to at least including a knob for volume control, it isn’t hard to learn to like the interface).

A basic suite of apps lets you get to the settings for phone connection, Bluetooth and navigation, and the screen is also where the side mirror camera’s image is displayed.

This is one of my favorite features in any Honda product that includes it (not all models do), a rear-facing camera in the side mirror that comes on automatically when you signal a right turn (or when you activate it with the button on the stalk on the steering wheel) that shows a driver what is right beside them – a cyclist, for example.

The Insight uses a 1.5L gasoline engine mated to the hybrid drive’s electric motor, pumping a potential 151 horsepower and 197 lb.-ft. of torque.

Honda says fuel economy will average 4.6L/100 km in city driving (and 5.4L on the highway). I came in a little over that, but still well within ‘good’ economy territory.

The Insight offers the usual choices of drive modes found on a lot of hybrid cars – you’ve got Sport, Econ and full electric (EV). I’ll mention, too, that Sport mode isn’t just an afterthought on the Insight; it really does give the car some jam.

But with me being something of a skinflint, I ran it in Econ mode for most of my time with the car, and you know what? For everyday, regular ol’ daily driving, Econ is fine. I never felt underpowered with it, and any time I was concerned about needing some extra oomph for a quick merge, I’d just jab the Sport button for additional acceleration.

Steering, handling and braking were likewise fine. Better than average, I would say.

Combine this with a genuinely nice interior, a black-on-black motif in the case of the vehicle I used, and the Insight is a solid package for a compact family sedan.

The price, well tell me what you think. Granted this one here is Touring trim, feature packed and with no additional option packages, but it tipped the scales at $34,245 (that’s including freight and tax)

Insight has also got some serious competition coming down the pike, both from the segment-dominating Prius family.

Oh, and Toyota’s newest entry, the Corolla Hybrid, which we’ll be checking out next – but spoiler alert: it came in nearly 5K cheaper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2019 Honda Passport

Okay, the Passport is touted as all-new for 2019, but let’s start with the question that I (and everyone else I showed the Touring-trim test vehicle to during my time in it) asks:

What’s the difference between this and Honda’s other, very similar vehicle, the Pilot?

Because at a glance, they look a lot alike to my eye, both are pretty much the same size (and use the same engine, and depending on the trim level, the same transmission) and be honest, they look alike. In fact, I would cavalierly say that you could just just think of it as a Pilot without the third row of seats, but that wouldn’t be quite correct.

Both vehicles use the same engine, a 3.5L six-cylinder that promises a capable 280 horsepower (and 262 lb.-ft. of torque), and a nine-speed automatic transmission (at least in the case of the Touring trim models, which was the case with test car; and both can be had with all-wheel drive.

The Passport, is slightly shorter, end-to-end, and also slightly wider and taller on a wheelbase that is almost the same (it is three whole millimetres shorter with the Passport). Oddly, despite this, the Passport’s turning radius is greater than the Pilot. Oh, and Passport has more second row legroom, owing to not having a third row squeezed in behind it.

This fine by me, and possibly for most potential customers, as I don’t need or use the third row in any vehicle I test, and the seats get folded down to make for more cargo space – which the Passport offers plenty of, boasting an interior cargo volume of 1,430 litres.

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So there’s that. Mostly though, it dishes out a Honda-level utility vehicle experience and brings its AWD platform and ground clearance to the real world where I recently drove one around for a week.

As I always enjoy mentioning, my city is fraught with potholes and uneven road surfaces, and in the summer we love to compound that by tearing up all the streets and major thoroughfares at once; in order to provide the residents with a delightful challenge – hence the desirability of an SUV or crossover vehicle.

I actually beat the NRCan fuel economy projection (11.3L/100km) after a week in the Passport, running it in Eco mode most of the time.

It handles all the bumps very well (including those ruthless extra-large speed bumps they put in quiet, children-infested neighbourhoods, those really tall ones that’ll rip your underside off if you’re driving a low-slung sports car) and a pretty capable suspension smoothed the ride and kept everything comfortable inside the cabin in both rows.

Some credit for Passport’s bump absorption must go to the seats. Well padded affairs, wrapped in leather upholstery and fairly roomy for people of almost any size, they are comfortable in either row and the driver’s perch offers a good range of adjustment.

Fire it up via push-button start, and appreciate the clean look of the instrument cluster – easy to read with all the major gauges obvious and use. The steering wheel houses a number of buttons, which you may also appreciate, as you may be using the steering-mounted controls more than the touchscreen interface (because the touchscreen has almost no buttons – although Honda at least brought the on/off/volume control knob back). You know what I figure it could use, is a central control knob on the centre console, such as you’d find in Mazda’s products.

Meh, I’m not sure I can fall in love with this.

What you do find on the centre console is the gear selector, which is the ‘strip-of-buttons’ arrangement found on most Honda (and Acura) vehicles. I have never really liked this thing, although really, it doesn’t offend anything but my dinosaurian sensibilities, which demand a proper shifter.

Boiling it all down, the Passport is an option for people who like the Pilot for its overall size and capabilities, but don’t need to stuff up to eight people into it. It also comes with a sticker price a few grand less than Pilot: the model I drove, Touring trim, came to $50,911.25 including freight and PDI

And, for those who like the size and configuration, but don’t care for Honda’s interface and controls, check out competitors like Toyota’s Highlander, the Kia Sorento or Hyundai’s Santa Fe (among many others, of course. This is a crowded segment, gentle shopper, with lots of choices available).

2018 Honda Clarity Touring

Another Home Run from Honda

Back in the day, the guy whose job it was to use the pole with the suction cup on it to rearrange the numbers on gas station’s signs would have been frantically working overtime to keep up with the rapidly changing cost of fuel.

A good-looking PHEV sedan with family-friendly space and cargo room, designed to run on purely electric power as much as possible.

Good thing we live in the future now, and those signs are electronic and can be revised with the touch of a button, making the numbers easy to change as gas prices rocket skyward; fluctuating wildly all the way.

It is times like these that hybrids and pure-electric vehicles attract attention anew, and Honda’s Clarity has been one of my favorites this year.

The car is a plug-in electric vehicle, with the gasoline engine combined with electric motor setup everyone is by now familiar with, but the deal with PHEV vehicles is that the hybrid battery can be recharged by – yes, plugging it in.

Here’s the thing with pluggable hybrids like the Clarity, they can be charged with household current (although that takes a long time, but if you can leave it overnight that will top up the battery), or more quickly with high-voltage Level 2 or Level 3 charging stations. Not everybody has 240v available at their home, of course, but an infrastructure is beginning to develop making the fast chargers available.

These can be few and far between, though, depending on where you live. I think there are a grand total of three such stations in my area (I found one at an Ikea store, and two more at branches of the Edmonton Public Library).

And here’s the salient point: I ended up with an overall fuel economy rating of 1.9L per hundred kilometers driven after putting on about 340 km in mostly city driving, when I was able to keep the Clarity fully charged. That’s insane.

Of course, that number changes when the battery gets low and the car uses the gasoline engine more; you’ll especially notice it on the highway – although even driving from Edmonton to Calgary under mostly gas power, the vehicle still came in at just over 6L/100 km.

A Clarity featured in the recent AJAC EcoRun event won a lot of hearts and minds with this kind of economy, and kudos for remaining an all-round ‘real’ car as well.

Honda touts the model as a ‘no compromise’ vehicle, citing the reassuring presence of the gasoline engine as a counter to range anxiety (which is a real thing, btw. I have driven purely battery-operated vehicles and experienced first hand the lump in the throat that starts when the juice gets low and you still have a fair distance to go).

Wrapped around all the technology, though, is a pretty decent car regardless of the drivetrain.

The one in the photos here is a Touring trim (so, top of the Clarity line), which showed off good people- space inside (along with overall cargo volume), and a comfortable array of surfaces and supports for passengers.

Clarity doesn’t compromise the driving experience, with more-than-ample power and torque (it outdoes a number of competitors, like Hyundai’s Sonata or the Kia Optima PHEVs, and Ford’s soon-departing Fusion Energi) with the combined output from the system rated at 212 hp.

Three major drive modes are selectable, the usual Normal, Eco and Sport choices (and a driver really can feel the difference in response when put into Sport) as well as what Honda has named ‘HV Mode’ – designed for use at highway speeds when the gasoline engine can be used to recharge the hybrid battery.

The price is where potential buyers may get balky, but in areas where rebates are available for purchasing efficient cars (I’ve read that it can be up $14K in some regions, but that doesn’t apply in Alberta), that may be something people can justify. Especially with the fuel saving factored in.

The 2018 Clarity starts at $39,900 for a base model; but the Touring trim test car I used pushes that to $43,900

Pretty neat stuff any way you approach it, and I must admit it’s kind of cool living in the future. Despite the loss of those gas station sign-changer jobs.

 

2018 Honda Accord Touring 1.5 litre

Some would have you believe that sedans are on their way out, as drivers opt for crossovers and utility vehicles in increasing numbers, but the sedan segment continues to offer some considerable alternatives for people who still enjoy a midsize four-door conveyor fit for the whole family.

The venerable ‘car’ shape has been stoked, refined, continually improved and benefitted with advancing technology; and in the flagship examples of every manufacturer, imbued with a heaping helping of high style to keep them in the minds of buyers.

Examples from Kia, Hyundai and Ford’s current generation Fusion display what can be done with the platform, but this year may be owned by Honda, who have never been afraid to remake a vehicle completely from generation to generation.

Honda has been doing wonderful things with styling the past couple of years, if you witness last year’s redesign of their best-selling Civic in all its configurations, and the same holds true for our subject this time out: the 2018 Accord.

Now, obviously styling is a matter of taste, but I love the look of the latest Civic and if you do too the Accord is candy, with its swept back, European-influenced lines.

This is the 10th generation of Honda’s flagship family sedan, a complete remake of the popular marque that sports new-look features inside and out.

I’m going to mention here the car we’re looking at is the sedan version, you can also get it as a coupe, and there are two engine options for gasoline-powered models.

Inside the Touring is a comfortably leather-upholstered cabin, with decent space overhead and from side to side, extra legroom has been carved out in the rear seat passengers as well.

It has a suitable comfortable and fully adjustable driver’s seat and some nice high-end touches, like a heated steering wheel and oh, look: buttons! Honda has done away with their previous interface, which I never really loved, to be honest with you – it was a mainly touchscreen interaction that was finicky to use. Give me good ol’ buttons any day, what with the tactile feedback ease-of-use and so forth.

Another feature I always enjoy is a heads up display, and this year’s Accord Touring brings a nice, bright large readout, hovering just above the hoodline (from the driver’s point of view). You can change the information display, but I settled on an easy-to-read speed display and the arrows of the turn-by-turn navigation system in the test car.

The engine in this test car is the smaller of two gasoline powerplants available: a 1.5L four-cylinder Earth Dreams i-Vtec that pushes out a surprising 192 horsepower.

I should also mention that the Accord can also be had with a 2.0L engine that will crank that up to 252 ponies (the larger engine comes with the Accord Sport 2.0 trim level, as well as the appropriately name Touring 2.0 trim. There is also a hybrid, using a combination of gas engine and electric motor – not unlike its major competitor, Toyota’s Camry, which we just recently featured on our delightful Youtube channel. Go ahead, click that. We improve a little each time

Anyway, getting back on topic, the 1.5L Touring trim yielded up good fuel economy on its own. I ran it mostly in Economy mode, primarily because I have to pay for my own gas, but it does have the Sport mode function, which will ramp up the performance noticeably; making the accelerator more responsive and holding the transmission in lower gears a little longer in order to pump the engine rpm.

Also interesting is that there are three transmissions available for the Accord lineup; mine used a CVT automatic, but the can be had with a six-speed manual or a new, ten-speed automatic gearbox (which you can only get with the Sport 2 and Touring 2).

Rather than blabber statistics and trim-walk stuff, I’ll just put up a pdf straight from Honda: Here y’go

Check it out if just for the rundown of active safety features and driver-assist technologies

Suffice it to say the newest Accord handles and performs well. The steering feels good, with the kind of feel of “weight” tuned into it that I like, and the handling is really enjoyable with the newly lowered body.

If you’re a sedan person (and yes, I remember what I said back at the beginning, people are increasingly opting for small crossovers and utility vehicles for their better ground clearance and available AWD systems) have a look at this car; and compare it point for point against the major competition, which I figure would be the Kia Optima, Ford’s Fusion or our old friend the Camry.

Even the price isn’t off the dial for a car as well padded as our tester, with a Canadian MSRP of $35,790

Please feel free to subscribe to our channel – we’ll have another Honda up pretty soon, a minivan this time – why at this rate we’ll soon be as popular as the Internet screaming head/conspiracy nuts or twentysomething fashion v-loggers! Haha, just kidding, we’ll never be that popular.