2020 Toyota Corolla Hybrid

 

Gimme hybrids all day long, that’s my new motto.

That is my maxim, my mantra, my short, pithy statement expressing a general truth or rule of conduct, my thing-that-I-say.

Not just because of the lower tailpipe emissions and overall level of quietness, but of course because I don’t have to jump to the gas-pumps as often, to refuel.

Thus it is that I love the latest of Toyota’s hybrid lineup to make it over to Canada – the 2020 Corolla. (It is interesting to note, too, that the company has a really huge variety of hybrid powertrain vehicles available in overseas markets, from minivans to subcompacts like this cool Yaris I drove in the Netherlands back in 2015).

The gas/electric Corolla combines a 1.8L engine with the nickel-metal hydride battery pack that forms Toyota’s Hybrid Synergy Drive system, adding two electric motors to the mix. Combined output from the system is rated at 121 hp and 105 lb.-ft. of torque.

The transmission is a two-speed CVT, and the Corolla brings the fairly industry-standard drive mode choices of Eco, Sport and (default) Normal, along with the ability to run it under purely electric power (for short distances). The car will also switch into pure EV mode even at pretty decent speeds when the system senses it can get by that way.

Another interesting feature unique the Hybrid version is that 15-inch wheels are standard issue on the car. While this may not attract attention they way larger wheels found on some of the competition, consider it from a cost-of-ownership perspective – i.e., fifteen-inch tires are going to be less expensive to replace than a set of 17” low-profile rubber.

The whole Corolla platform has been updated for 2020, now running on the company’s Global Architecture platform, and the Hybrid benefits from all of that, but rather than bore you with a litany about the updates, I’ll just post this link straight to the horse’s mouth, so to speak. After all, Mindful Reader, you don’t come to wozeroff.com to see a retyped press release, you come here for a drawing of a pregnant walrus. We’ll get to that later.

Suffice to say, the vehicle is easy to get used to and easy to get comfortable in. The upgraded interior of my test car gave me ‘Softex’ leather seating surfaces and a heated steering wheel, Apple CarPlay and an 8-way adjustable power driver’s seat.

The Corolla handles very well for its segment, steering feel and brake response were very good, and I never felt I lacked power, despite the relatively low horse-and-torque figures. Putting it in Sport mode when I wanted all the available power boosted the accelerator response noticeably, and the little sedan now looks as good as it should, thanks to an exterior makeover that finally sees Corolla getting a better appearance from all angles, and a lowered stance for curb appeal.

The real takeaway from my time in the car, however, is here:

Yes, that’s right. I actually beat the company’s stated fuel economy figure (which is 4.4L/100km) in combined city/hwy driving, and I wasn’t trying particularly hard; although I did predominantly use it Eco mode, for a week of (mostly) city driving.

So overall, it’s all good, right? Well, sure, but with a couple of caveats:

Obviously, it isn’t a sports car. Performance is quite acceptable, but if you’re looking for adrenalin-filled thrills, you need to look elsewhere.

Also – and again, obviously – this is compact car. The rear seats are best for smaller people (although I must note that the Corolla rear seats have more head and legroom than the Honda Civic sedan, and more legroom than a Kia Forte).

I had no issue with room and space in the front seats, and I am 6’2” and roughly 190 lbs (of solid, rippling muscle), but if you have been – how shall I say this – blessed with the physique of a pregnant walrus, you’d be better advised to consider something larger.

A Hyundai Palisade, perhaps. If you’re googling that, remember that ‘Palisade’ has only one L in the name.

Oh, and the overall quiet of the vehicle is something to be aware of. Particularly when you’re running in purely electric mode, the Corolla Hybrid makes almost no sound; and it is important to be conscious that pedestrians and cyclists can’t hear you coming up behind them.

Heck, you could sneak up on a dog with this car in EV mode.

That’s about it for ‘cons’ though, even the price isn’t going to scare anyone. The vehicle starts at $24,790 for a base model, and the one used to for my story here added two grand for a Premium Package option, which brought things like the heated, leather steering wheel, 8-way power driver’s seat, heated rear seats, leather seating and wireless smartphone charging and still only came to $28,566 (including freight and PDI).