2018 Outlander PHEV

OUTLANDEMONIUM

Alright, I am totally down with hybrids and increasingly, plugin hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV, is acronym, I figure most everybody knows that by now). Not just for the best of reasons, either – although the case for lower tailpipe emissions and decreased resource consumption is compelling – but for selfish concerns, i.e., it costs me less to drive them.

Honda’s Clarity has been one the big revelations I’ve been treated to this year, when one brought incredible FE numbers at the Auto Journalist’s association EcoRun event earlier this year, and then even incredible-er results during my time in a test car this fall.

An increasing number of PHEVs are coming online from all segments in the market, riding on platforms from compact to luxury, to the country’s current-favorite configuration: crossover SUVs

This is where Mitsubishi has positioned itself, with their best-selling (indeed the company claims it to the world’s best-selling) PHEV – the Outlander.

I had the opportunity for a good look at the 2018 Outlander PHEV out here in the Paris of the Prairies during what could characterized as either the best of times or the worst of times; depending on your perspective.

See, when I picked up the test model (in top-of-the-line GT trim) Edmonton had been blessed with an early snowfall and accompanying subzero temps – which on one hand, sucks if you’re a human and other hand sucks if you’re an electric vehicle.

Cold temperatures affect battery capabilities along with human capabilities (especially when you can’t find your snow-brush and have to de-ice the car with your hands), but the silver lining was getting to see how a PHEV would deal with northern climates in real life.

I didn’t get as anxious as I would have if I had been using a purely-electric vehicle though, because the Outlander PHEV is a hybrid; combining it’s two (yes, two, one at the front and one at the rear) electric motors with a capable 2.0 litre gasoline engine.

Starting off in the vehicle with nearly no charge left in its batteries (it had come in from a long highway drive and sat overnight getting snowed on), the Outlander’s economy monitor stated it was currently getting 9.2L/100 km from the gas engine.

The plug-in model’s batteries can be charged in a number of ways, by plugging into standard household current, or faster Level 2 or Level 3 charging stations. Level 3 would be the fastest (Mitsu says it will come to 80% capacity in less than half an hour, but there aren’t a lot of Level 3s around here. There’s one at a Simons store across town, purported to be free, but requires a membership in the Flo network).

A cool thing about the Simons location is the massive array of solar panels overhead:

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In past experience, I have found that household current takes a long time, so that was of less interest for me, but found a couple of level 2 charge points around town that were free to use – Ikea has a station, and so do a couple of branches of the public library.

Plugging it in at the library’s 240 volt station brought the Outlander up to full charge in a little over a couple of hours.

Now, I’ll just go ahead and spoil the ending for you – charging it very day brought the gas consumption down to a final result of 4.6L/100km, which is great, even exceeding the NRCan rating.

The charge drops fast when you’re running it in cold weather with the heated seats and the climate controls cranked (along with the heated steering wheel), so I made an effort to plug it into whatever was available everywhere I went; and attempted to run in fully electric mode as much as possible.

An interesting thing with the Mitsubishi’s sophisticated PHEV is that among its available drive modes is Battery Charge Mode. When activated, the Outlander uses the gasoline engine to recharge the lithium-ion packs as you drive – slowly, but it does work. I could see the power level increase from nearly depleted levels as I drove with the feature turned on.

The company states the Outlander is also currently the only plug-in hybrid that can operate in 4WD mode on fully electric power.

I’ll leave it at that before this turns into a James Joyce style, novel-length litany about the many aspects of Mitsubishi’s technical wizardry, but if you want to learn more about their system, check their site.

Setting aside the hybrid component, the Outlander still stacks up as a useful family ute and daily driving vehicle.

It brings the cargo space and passenger volume buyers in the segment want, and offers a comfortable seating scheme and cabin, good quality materials and upholstery.

When option’d up to the top-of-the-line GT that my test model was, the vehicle packs on a adaptive cruise control, boosts the safety suite with a collision mitigation system and multi-view camera, and adds a Rockford Fosgate audio package.

All the major controls and switchgear are easy to figure out and use (and interestingly, the shifter pattern is nearly identical to what you get with Toyota’s Prius).

About the only complaints I can muster after spending some time in the Outlander were that mine didn’t have a heads-up display (although it did have an easy-read digital speedo above the gauges).

Oh, and no navigation system. Its seems if you want the nav, you have to run it through an app on your phone. Don’t know why, frankly, as pretty much everything else in this price range seems to have navigation included.

Styling, too, the Outlander is well… it’s kinda ‘meh’. Judge for yourself of course, but on the outside the vehicle is unremarkable. In fact, I encountered a lot of people who thought it was a Toyota Highlander.

And getting to the price, the Outlander stays competitive; especially if you live in an area where EVs are eligible for rebates (I don’t, though).

The entry level starts at $42,998 and the GT I drove takes that to $49,998