2018 Toyota Prius Tech

Roight. By now, with the world-changing vehicle in its fourth incarnation, you probably don’t need an explanation of what the Prius is, or the basics of hybrid cars; so we can just go straight to our look at this 2018 iteration of Toyota much loved-and-lauded ecofriendly compact.

Notice, though, that this one is the regular Prius, the latest generation of the original five-door passenger friendly runabout, but there are now four models within the family to choose from (you’ve also got the smaller Prius C, the larger Prius V, and the plug-in hybrid Prius Prime).

This one here is your basic Prius, but in the Technology trim.

The Tech model starts at about three grand over the base buy-in, and adds a whack of desirable functions (not all of which fall under my definition of ‘tech’, but we can talk about that some other time, eh?)

What you get with the Tech trim is: a blind spot monitor system (with

rear cross traffic alert, which I always make a point of mentioning is one my favorite safety features in any vehicle), an auto-dimming rear view mirror , rain sensing wipers, and Toyota’s clever ‘intelligent clearance sonar’ and parking assist – whereby the car will parallel park itself.

Another thing you get with the Tech trim is a heads-up display, which is great because it keeps all the important info (like your digital speed display) right in easy eyesight. One thing I always disliked about Prius was the way the info was displayed on the center stack, where you have to shift your gaze away from the road. The center info panel is still there, of course, with its 7” screen providing more detailed information.

My Tech test car also provided a decent driver environment, with heated, 8-way adjustable seat (the seating is branded as something called ‘Softex’). The seating is indeed passably comfortable all around, front headroom is good (the rear less so, frankly, so you don’t want to be too tall if you’re going to ride back there all day).

The cabin impression in the test vehicle was ‘dark’ overall, with mainly black surfaces and upholstery occasionally interrupted with white plastic molding and the blue accent of the shift knob.

Outwardly, the car has become more aerodynamic and dare I say stylish with the redesign – still polarizing, mid you, I got a variety of reactions to its appearance – in a marked departure from the Prius shape we’ve all gotten used to.

Not a bad looking little auto, in my opinion; and certainly still distinctive; if less slick-and-sporty than they may have been going for.

But the point of the Prius remains fuel efficiency and lower tailpipe emissions, and the consumption rating of 4.5L/100 km (NRCan number) is the biggest driving force in the car’s world-beating sales numbers.

I’ll confess I didn’t get that during my time in this one, but as you can see in the photos, I drove it during Edmonton winter; so the vehicle was working harder in the snow as well as running the heater the whole time, which has an impact.

As a bit of trivia, the Prius used in the EcoRun event in 2016 ended up at 3.2L/100 km (which works out to 73.5 mpg in US gallons)

The power train is a reliable 1.8 litre gasoline engine, paired with the company’s Hybrid Synergy Drive electric motor system. It’ll output a combined 121 horsepower (and 98 hp from just the gas engine alone) and 105 lb-ft of torque which, while not big numbers by today’s standards, is more than enough to get the Prius up to speed, and responsive enough that I never find myself nervous or apprehensive about merging and passing in general use.

You know going in that you’re not buying a sports car, and I doubt anyone is confused about that, but instead a thoroughly capable and competent car that delivers daily usefulness backed up by years of customer satisfaction and near-universal praise from institutions like Consumer Reports.

Pricing starts at the 30K level, and my Prius Tech tester came with a sticker of $34,637.50 and that’s without factoring in any incentives that may be available in your area (I live in Alberta, where there aren’t any incentives for buying hybrids or electric vehicles; and am not sure what the situation is in BC, ON or Quebec).