2018 Crashed Ice in Edmonton

Well, that was pretty entertaining.

We took in Redbull’s Crashed Ice event on its Edmonton stop this past weekend, the last stop on a globe spanning tour that has seen this Ice Cross Downhill World Championships stop in cities from Finland to France to the US and Canada – in fact, the race was in La Sarre Quebec before bring the action to Edmonton, the final stop on the tour.

I confess I wasn’t familiar with the sport before we attended the Edmonton; but it isn’t too hard to get your brain around the concept, it’s a downhill skate race over a course that looks pretty extreme.

The skaters go off in heats of up to four, and rocket down an elaborate elevated course with a heavily iced surface, first one to the finish line wins. Sounds straightforward enough, right? But its easier said than done when you’re traveling at speeds of up to 80km/h.

No question this qualifies as an extreme sport, my friends, and I have nothing but respect for all the athletes who made it to the Edmonton final round.

(Incidentally, the overall winners were crowned here Saturday night, and American Amanda Trunzo took the honors in the women’s division, and Canada’s Scott Croxall won the men’s.

The full results can be seen here on Redbull’s Crashed Ice page

But it wasn’t just about the races themselves, this was a full-on, get-out-and-enjoy the spectacle in downtown E-town, where the streets around the Shaw center were closed off and people marched down Grierson hill to a site filled with a really decent crowd around the ice-cross track.

Adding another level of interest, this is the first year that Hyundai Motors has partnered with Redbull for the Crashed Ice show, the Korean manufacturer is using the extreme sport to showcase a couple of their more extreme vehicles – the newest generation of pumped-up Velosters.

The three door hatchbacks are being groomed for rally sport with the introductions of the 2019 Veloster Turbo and their halo hatch, the Veloster N

The Turbo was on display up at street level, showing off for the crowd with a sporty leatherclad interior and matte paint-job on it that looked pretty appealing.

This one boasts 201hp 195 lb.-ft. of torque (and I’m told it will be available with a manual transmission as well), but the monster Veloster, the N, was strictly on display at Crashed Ice.

Mirko Lahti of Finland, Alex Schrefels of the United States, Jesse Sauren of Finland and Joni Saarinen of Finland compete during the Junior Competition at the tenth and final stage of the ATSX Ice Cross Downhill World Championship at the Red Bull Crashed Ice in Edmonton, Canada on March 9, 2018.

Here it is up on a pedestal in front of one of the first drops on the ice course, looking sporty; and when it hits the streets and showrooms this car will really be bringing the performance.

A 2.0L turbocharged engine pushing 275 horses and 260 lb.-ft. of torque, riding on an electronically controlled suspension and offering a selection of driving modes tuned for track performance; with distinctive body sculpting and detailing to differentiate this top of the line model from the Turbo and other members of the Veloster lineup.

The N won’t be available until later in the year, so this is our first look at it, but we’ll be hoping to take a drive in this little monster when it arrives.

And on a less adrenalizing but perhaps more practical note, Hyundai had their newest urban-oriented utility vehicle on hand as well – here’s the 2018 Kona at their display in downtown Edmonton.

Now if you’re like me, gentle reader, you probably realize that while you may want the Veloster, the Kona is the one that makes a better case for purchase as all-round everyday vehicle for all seasons.

And that’s about it. Having seen this year’s Crashed Ice competition, I’m a fan; and having seen Edmonton’s support for the event and the good time had by everyone I met there I’d bet the event’s sponsors and promoters are fans of us too.

Check out the Youtube here:




2018 Mercedes-Benz C 300 Wagon

This time out we have a wagon, and not just any wagon, mind you, but a premium vehicle from Mercedes, in the form of a long-roofed C- class: a 2018 C 300 Wagon.

I’m a big fan of hatchbacks, so it stands to reason that a wagon-bodied car is equally appealing to me; what with them bringing the convenience of a five-door vehicle, just, you know, longer.

This bodystyle seems to make an appearance from time to time in cars from a number of manufacturers, hangs around for a product cycle or two and then fades away. I’m thinking of a few that I have liked over the years – Mazda’s Protege5 (and later the Mazda6 wagon from the mid-aughts, Subaru’s Legacy wagon, heck even the Dodge Magnum, I’ll count that too.

But this German family-friendly conveyance is a bit different. More of an upper-class status machine, more executive caliber, fancier all around, and with more bells and whistles.

Its a good time of year to flail about in the C Wagon, for as you see it is a pretty cold day out there; with repeated dumpings of snow over the past few days. The Benz tester sport Mercedes awd system (called 4MATIC by the company) and has been handling itself admirably.

Now that’s a cluster. I always opt for the digital speedometer display, of the choices the C 300 offers

Notice, too, that the C isn’t a crossover, so it doesn’t have quite the ground clearance that you would get in models like the GLC, but I haven’t got the car stuck yet and it grips the road competently and handles well in these conditions.

It has power enough, although the C 300s 2.0 litre turbo engine isn’t at the top of the class, but 241 horses and 273 lb.-ft of torque haul it around with ample to spare. Acceleration is good, in any of the drive modes (I ran it mostly in Eco, just for the fuel economy benefits, but the C comes alive with Sport and Sport+ modes that tailor the combination of engine response and transmission behavior to a more active driving style.

A 9-speed automatic transmission marshals the engine power (and there are steering mounted paddle shifters if you like to get involved in changing your own gears, but really, I found the C’s 9G-TRONIC just fine making its own decisions).

Outwardly, this is a good-looking wagon – more so than it looks in the photos, as it is covered in ice – and easily recognizable as being part of the Benz family.

It is a piece of art inside as well, very comfortable (in a ‘cozy’ sort of way, as the C class is smaller overall than Mercedes’ E or S class vehicles. The seats are upholstered Artico leather (or ‘leatherlike substance’, if you will) comfortable in both rows and favoring the driver with a cockpit-like feel.

I loved the Burmester sound system in the test model, and the additional (and optional) technology included in this one fleshed out the space age appeal of the C with a 360-degree bird’s eye view simulation displayed on the center console monitor.

In case you haven’t been in a Benz for a while, here’s the main controller set for the company’s COMAND system for accessing the various onboard functions. It… requires some getting used to, but frankly I think I like it as well as Lexus’ touchpad, or BMW’s iDrive.

The car rides beautifully, of course, and that is the company’s main claim to fame. I don’t think I’ve ever had a Benz – and I mean any of the models – that anyone I had out for a ride didn’t remark on the incredible smoothness and quiet that almost leaves a passenger disconnected from the road. It’s actually a pretty relaxing way to be ferried around.

Through and through, the 2018 C 300 wagon is quite a machine, certainly more practical and versatile than the sedan version of the C, and this one here is very well equipped; but there’s a ‘but’ attached to this statement my friends.

For you see, to make it this well equipped, many an option package was included with the car, and as you might imagine it all comes at a price.

Starting at an initial buy-in of $46,000, the wagon got a $5000 Premium package, Premium Plus package, Selenite grey paintjob, heated steering wheel, satellite radio and the upgraded sound system, all at additional expense, in addition to the ‘dark ash wood trim. Here’s a breakdown: C 300 Wagon_2018_WDDWH4KB7JF579954

And that took the whole thing up to $57,865. Now of course that’s nothing to a couple of high rollers like you and I, gentle viewer, but make no mistake, that’s getting up there.

And this is a thing that always kind of bugs me, when an already pricey car requires a suite of add-ons to bring it to the level of desirability that attracted you to the brand in the first place.

Nevertheless, that’s just me.

Feel free to check out a quick video of the C Wagon on our Youtube channel!





Burger Baron Rules

An Edmonton Original

Okay, this here is one of my favourite places in the city for quality diner fare – Burger Baron!

This my lifelong favorite – the Double Mushroom with cheese.

It’s a chain (albeit, a small one) and you can find several locations here in town; but my go-to stop has always been the landmark 82 ave spot, just a little east of 75th street, in its iconic A-frame building.

I can remember my dad taking the family there starting back in… well, since just about as far back as I can remember (I was born in ’64, and apparently the first BB opened up in 1963). It was always a real treat, and I swear ta gawd, it still is!

So when you inevitably find yourself in Edmonton, seriously, go out of your way to get to the BB, and order the Double Mushroom with cheese. They’ve got other ones too, of course – you won’t go wrong with a Rudy’s special for example, but if you want my two bits worth, double mushroom avec cheese.

The ‘shrooms are fried on the spot, the beef is good quality and the bun is the crowning touch – a nice, fresh one toasted to perfection!

This is a proper drive-through or dine-in hamburger, right here my friends; and it isn’t overpriced and it isn’t pretentious and it isn’t cluttered.


Just look at this and you’ll know right away you want one.

I want another one right now; and here’s the thing: you patronize the Baron and you’re doing business with a really good, likeable hometown team that deserves your dollars and earns it, one burger at a time!

Can’t recommend them highly enough! Eat here. Check out their Yelp reviews.

Good Lovin’

Like all good, decent people, I’m a big pizza fan, and here’s place that deserves some word of mouth. Nice people, a good location with free parking in the strip-mall lot (which is a real plus the downtown area), and most importantly, very good pizza made well and with quality ingredients. Prices are reasonable as well.

Here’s a couple photos, including my go-to choice, the “Meatatarian”, but check out their full menu online here. Oh, and their FB page, too.

Customers can watch their pie being assembled at the order counter, and run through the nifty transport oven; then have it boxed up for takeaway or eat it on site – which is what I recommend. Nice ambience during the lunchtime rush, and bottles of olive oil on the table (both regular and spicy).

Relatively new to the Edmonton scene, Love Pizza now has two locations in our fine town. I’ve eaten at the downtown location a couple of times now (10196 109st in the Canterra strip plaza), and highly recommend them.

Viphalay Restaurant

Pad Thai at Viphalay, downtown.

I can’t think of any sort of rhyming punditry for the restaurant’s name (I almost went with ‘Viphalay A-OK’, but then I remembered the sophisticated audience I serve, here on the world’s finest website and realized no way would my readers tolerate that), so instead just have a look at this over on the right:

This is a lunch I had at Viphalay (the downtown one, they have two locations) with my classmates from MicroBusiness Training Center. It’s a wildly popular lunch spot downtown, specializing in Laotian/Thai influenced food, and it rocks!

I recommend the Pad Thai, but the selection of curries that a number of my Microbusiness alumni ordered also looked and smelled worthy of consideration.

The fare isn’t cheap, but it isn’t wildly high-priced, either (everybody’s entree came in at under $20, not including tip).

Reservations are a must, particularly for the lunch crowd, and it is a great spot in an interesting repurposed older house for a sit-down meal that doesn’t disappoint.

BMW X5 40e

Electrifying Bavarian Design

BMW’s X5 utility vehicle lineup expanded back in the 2015 model year to include a fourth choice when they added the 40e to the family (there are three other X5 choices, two gasoline engine models and a diesel), and the 40e was the first of the company’s more mainstream vehicles to inherit the technology they developed for their more futuristic-looking i3 and i8 cars.

There aren’t a lot of PHEV vehicles in the premium/luxury segment, yet, but there a lot in the pipeline as everyone rushes into hybrid and fully electric automobiles – but Porsche’s Cayenne is already available with a similar drivetrain, for example.

Looking at it from the outside – and the inside, for that matter – the plugin X5 isn’t greatly different than the rest of the lineup, the readily identifiable grille and headlamps, and side-and-rear profile of the eDrive model are near identical, its mostly the badge and distinctive cover of the chargepoint on the driver’s side front panel that give it away.

All around, it retains the appearance, and that’s a good thing; as the X5 in general has been one of the company’s best sellers, and certainly their most practical offering for this time of year, out here in majestic Edmonton; the Paris of the Canadian prairies. I’mma apologize that the car is dirty in the test drive photos and Youtube vid, but you know, it’s hard to keep anything clean right now.

As a hybrid, the 40e is powered by a combination of electric motor and gasoline engine, in this case a 351v lithium ion battery mates with a 2.0L inline four-cylinder, aiming to optimize fuel economy with the electric assist, as well as lowering emissions. It can be run in strictly electric mode, as well, BMW claims for a distance up to 40km. So in theory, if you lived very close to where you work, you might scarcely ever have to fill up the tank. In theory, that is. In reality the cold conditions had me running on gasoline power for most of the week.

The gas engine on its own peaks at 241 horsepower and 258 lb.-ft of torque, and combined output with the electric motor shoots up to 313 horses. The hybrid X5, like all X5s, has EcoPro, Comfort (default) and Sport modes, which change the vehicles behavior by changing the shift point and throttle response.

Now, where a PHEV differs from a regular hybrid is that the battery can be recharged by – you guessed it – plugging the vehicle in. The 40e can be recharged on household current, although I’ll level with you, that takes a long time; but will also accept charging with level 2 or level 3 high-voltage fast chargers.

The problem with this, though, is that not a lot of people have an extra 220v panel at their homes, and at least there I live there aren’t a lot of Level 2 chargers available. Check this out, though, my test vehicle is equipped, through it navigation module, to find and locate charging stations. Pretty cool, eh? I found one at an Ikea store, and a row of three of them at one of Edmonton’s public libraries.

Screw these people.

But, prepare to gasp in horror and dismay, my friends, ‘cuz look what happened when I tried to use the library ones. Yeah. Do any of those look like plugin/electric vehicles to you?

Driving experience the X5 is very much like any of it’s linemates – it displays tight and responsive steering, great performance and acceleration in all of its drive modes, and does a good job of holding the road in corners; but I want to tell you, the hybrid is a heavy vehicle and you’ll feel that in the handling. It is almost 200kg heavier than the 35i gasoline only model, and actually weighs more than a Toyota Tacoma, for example. So, um, stopping distances are affected, as I learned in my first day in the car on icy roads.

The price jump for selecting the 40e may also influence your decision here, with a rather hefty premium coming with this power train. Here’s a breakdown of the pricing, if you’re interested: MY17 X5 40e Price

Consider that a 35i model starts at $68,500, and that jumps to $74,950 for the 40e plugin, but the test vehicle we are looking at here powered that to a frightening $88,500 when loaded up with option packages that take it to the level that I figure a premium-brand buyer would want.


2018 Honda Odyssey

I always like to start stories about this type of vehicle by restating the point that if you need a minivan, you should buy a minivan. Don’t try to weasel out and get an SUV with third-row seats because they look cooler, you’re a grownup now.

The vehicles make the most sense for many situations, and needn’t reek of soccer-dad mediocrity, particularly with some of the models available today, like this one here: a 2018 Honda Odyssey.

One of the more highly regarded minivans out there, and offering a nearly complete collection of practical function and usefulness (and seating for up to seven passengers in the case of my test van here), Odyssey brings more than family-friendliness, particularly in the Touring trim.

Spoiler: it also becomes one of the more expensive family vans you can buy if you select the Touring model, although not the most expensive well-equipped van I’ve seen for 2018 (that award would go to Chrysler’s latest Pacifica – you can find a look at it here).

I will stress also that while my Odyssey Touring test vehicle tipped in at over 50K, the lineup starts at $34,890, so the case can be made that it competitive with Kia’s Sedona or the Toyota Sienna.

The whole lineup gets the same engine, a redesigned 3.5 litre six-cylinder (built in Alabama) for this fifth-generation van, which has received a power boost for 2018 that pumps up the output to a pretty robust 280hp and 262 lb.-ft. of torque.

It’s a FWD drivetrain that handles well for a vehicle of its type, with steering that is likewise appropriate for this shape and size. Definitely a lighter feel than what you’d find in an Accord, but I wouldn’t want it to be overly ‘sporty’ anyway, for fear of throwing around the passengers in the rear seats.

The styling of the Odyssey hasn’t received the radical reworking of the sheetmetal that Honda’s Civic and latest Accord received; it’s still recognizable when parked side by side with the outgoing generation.

The 18 has a new-look grille and headlamps, a bit of extra pizzazz added stamped into the side panels, and the recognizable ‘lightnining bolt’ of the side window trim has been smoothed out a bit.

The body has been lightened, cabin sound insulation and overall ride improved, and two new transmissions added to the lineup; including a Honda’s ten-speed automatic (the company is awfully proud of the ten-speed, and offering it in a number of their vehicles in the upper trim levels, notably the latest Accord).

The 10-speed is one of only a few features that a buyer needs to move up to the Touring trim to get, though – if you can get by with only nine cogs, well, the rest of the lineup may do you just fine.

A couple of other exclusives for the Touring trim are worth noting, and mostly fall into the additional bells-and-whistles category, but my favorites are:

An upgraded, 11-speaker sound system (and rear seat entertainment package with Blu Ray player), ventilated front seats, a wi-fi hotspot app and additional ambient lighting; and perhaps most notable is the rear cross-traffic sensor – probably my favorite part of the modern safety suites being added to a lot of vehicles these days.

Also, an interesting techno-bit for parents (I am figuring that parents are the number one buyer of a van like the Odyssey) is the Cabin Watch and Cabin Talk components of Honda’s in-vehicle. It pulls up a wideangle view of the rear seats, and allows you to keep an eye on the kids in the back rows, and verbally admonish them if they’re, like, eating laundry pods or whatever back there. No more need to raise your voice as you threaten to turn this car around and drop them off at military camp.

The first two rows are the best seats in the Odyssey (the second rows captain’s chairs also slide, for easy access to the back, and space all ‘round is very good, as is outward visibility from the driver’s position).

In terms of the value case, well, as stated way back at the beginning, the Odyssey in Touring trim is one of the pricier family vans, but a buyer may not find it necessary to go all the way to the top-end to get a satisfying package – here’s a bit of trim walk through the lineup: 2018 Specs_Odyssey_EN

As for criticism of the ’18 Odyssey, well, the info interface isn’t as evolved as what I found in the latest Accord – there’s a volume button for the sound system, but most everything else is still touchscreen. Also a few people I showed the Touring to didn’t care for the unusual strip-of-buttons gear selector (very much like what you find in a number of vehicles from Acura).

This 2018 Touring level test van cam with an MSRP of $50,290 CDN, before freight and taxes.

Check out the Youtube video here!



Mercedes Benz E 400 Coupe

For 2018, a wicked two-door for the well-heeled 

Mercedes doesn’t require introduction in the world of tony, high-end vehicles, and the company offers an exhaustive range of choice for buyers across many pricepoints.

Not ‘any’ pricepoints, mind you, the pantheon of Benz is geared toward the customer with a premium car budget; but when you’re dressing for success and trying to impress the partners at the firm, that’s when you turn to German luxury and styling.

And the E-Class is the one to turn to, slightly better from a status standpoint than the C-Class, a few notches below the S-Class, and boasting major changes for this model year: the E400 4MATIC coupe.

(as is my wont, that will be the only time I spell it all in capitals like that. And, as you no doubt already know, 4Matic is Benz-speak for all-wheel drive).

The E400 has expanded for 2018, being both longer and wider (and just a little over an inch taller) than last year’s, and the engine still rates the same: a twin-turbo V6 capable of 329 horsepower and 354 lb.-ft. of torque.

Of course, if all you wanted was a powerful two-door, you’d buy a Mustang and save some money (unless you went with a Shelby Fastback, which is actually more expensive than the base E400), but if you’re shopping this one it’s all about the style.

Mercedes’ sets the tone with interiors, and while my test vehicle went with basic black as the dominant color scheme (it is available with optional brown, beige or two-tone color schemes), which imparts a feel of appropriately understated class.

Nappa leather upholstered seats face a redesigned dash crowned by digital displays (two of them on dash and console, each configurable and custom-tailorable as to the info they show) set on ash wood accented, curved surfaces.

The whole effect is wonderful to look at, and impressed everyone I showed the vehicle off to, but the icing on the cake in the E400 test car was the comfort of the first row; capped by my favorite option on the tester – massage seats.

Driver and front seat passenger will love this.

Seriously, up until I climbed into the E400 I would have said the seats in the previously featured BMW 440i were my favorite buckets in any luxury car I have driven; but the offers adjustable back massage of the E has won my heart.

The feature – like almost all onboard function in the E – is engaged and configured through a central controller on the console. This isn’t unusual for most luxury vehicles, you’ll find similar systems in all the premium cars, and while it isn’t as intuitive and straightforward as I want, I will say that like the Mercedes implementation of it (branded as COMAND, all in capitals once again) better than the touchpad of Lexus or the twiddle-and-poke function of BMW’s iDrive module.

Anyway, I’m saying 10 out of 10 for style and comfort throughout the cabin, with a bonus for the LED accent strip that rings the cockpit, which can be tailored according to your mood through the aforementioned Comand module.

Outwardly, you’ll still recognize the E Coupe, despite the company’s insistence that it is ‘all-new’ they haven’t departed too radically from their winning formula, and this is what really works for the car.

The fascia and headlight treatment is new, as are the air intakes and ‘diamond’ grille, and hood has been resculpted with what they call a powerdome bulge added; but the side windows and overall profile are still very similar to the 2017 model year.

It is a beautiful piece of sculpture, no question, but I like the way Benz has kept the outward appearance shy of being ostentatious and show-offy.

Driving the E400 is what really sells the car – from inside the ultra-quiet cabin the flat and stable ride garners approval from passengers in both front and rear seats, and the smoothness of acceleration from the three-litre six meshes so well with the steering feel that it will quickly spoil a driver for anything else.

The nine-speed transmissions fluid shifts are seamless in any of the drive modes, but the E allows you to takeover the shifting with wheel-mounted paddle shifters for those who enjoy the extra feel of being in charge.

All-wheel drive also brings a broader, year-round appeal to the platform, especially if you live in a climate zone where you just know its gonna snow.

I don’t have a lot of criticism of the E400 coupe overall, but for the really obvious:

The coupe body, having just two doors, in my mind makes it a de facto two-seater (its not, of course, the car will hold four people after all, but if you regularly haul more than one passenger you will want to check out the proper sedan version of the E-Class)

And then of course, the matter of price. My test model came with a sticker cost of $85,600, which included a number of option packages that brought it up to full luxury status.

You can pay a lot less and still come away with a pretty decent car from less prestigious brands, but hey, you can pay a lot more, too; compare it with a number of other similarly dressed-for-success autos from Audi, BMW or Lexus.

2018 Honda Accord Touring 1.5 litre

Some would have you believe that sedans are on their way out, as drivers opt for crossovers and utility vehicles in increasing numbers, but the sedan segment continues to offer some considerable alternatives for people who still enjoy a midsize four-door conveyor fit for the whole family.

The venerable ‘car’ shape has been stoked, refined, continually improved and benefitted with advancing technology; and in the flagship examples of every manufacturer, imbued with a heaping helping of high style to keep them in the minds of buyers.

Examples from Kia, Hyundai and Ford’s current generation Fusion display what can be done with the platform, but this year may be owned by Honda, who have never been afraid to remake a vehicle completely from generation to generation.

Honda has been doing wonderful things with styling the past couple of years, if you witness last year’s redesign of their best-selling Civic in all its configurations, and the same holds true for our subject this time out: the 2018 Accord.

Now, obviously styling is a matter of taste, but I love the look of the latest Civic and if you do too the Accord is candy, with its swept back, European-influenced lines.

This is the 10th generation of Honda’s flagship family sedan, a complete remake of the popular marque that sports new-look features inside and out.

I’m going to mention here the car we’re looking at is the sedan version, you can also get it as a coupe, and there are two engine options for gasoline-powered models.

Inside the Touring is a comfortably leather-upholstered cabin, with decent space overhead and from side to side, extra legroom has been carved out in the rear seat passengers as well.

It has a suitable comfortable and fully adjustable driver’s seat and some nice high-end touches, like a heated steering wheel and oh, look: buttons! Honda has done away with their previous interface, which I never really loved, to be honest with you – it was a mainly touchscreen interaction that was finicky to use. Give me good ol’ buttons any day, what with the tactile feedback ease-of-use and so forth.

Another feature I always enjoy is a heads up display, and this year’s Accord Touring brings a nice, bright large readout, hovering just above the hoodline (from the driver’s point of view). You can change the information display, but I settled on an easy-to-read speed display and the arrows of the turn-by-turn navigation system in the test car.

The engine in this test car is the smaller of two gasoline powerplants available: a 1.5L four-cylinder Earth Dreams i-Vtec that pushes out a surprising 192 horsepower.

I should also mention that the Accord can also be had with a 2.0L engine that will crank that up to 252 ponies (the larger engine comes with the Accord Sport 2.0 trim level, as well as the appropriately name Touring 2.0 trim. There is also a hybrid, using a combination of gas engine and electric motor – not unlike its major competitor, Toyota’s Camry, which we just recently featured on our delightful Youtube channel. Go ahead, click that. We improve a little each time

Anyway, getting back on topic, the 1.5L Touring trim yielded up good fuel economy on its own. I ran it mostly in Economy mode, primarily because I have to pay for my own gas, but it does have the Sport mode function, which will ramp up the performance noticeably; making the accelerator more responsive and holding the transmission in lower gears a little longer in order to pump the engine rpm.

Also interesting is that there are three transmissions available for the Accord lineup; mine used a CVT automatic, but the can be had with a six-speed manual or a new, ten-speed automatic gearbox (which you can only get with the Sport 2 and Touring 2).

Rather than blabber statistics and trim-walk stuff, I’ll just put up a pdf straight from Honda: Here y’go

Check it out if just for the rundown of active safety features and driver-assist technologies

Suffice it to say the newest Accord handles and performs well. The steering feels good, with the kind of feel of “weight” tuned into it that I like, and the handling is really enjoyable with the newly lowered body.

If you’re a sedan person (and yes, I remember what I said back at the beginning, people are increasingly opting for small crossovers and utility vehicles for their better ground clearance and available AWD systems) have a look at this car; and compare it point for point against the major competition, which I figure would be the Kia Optima, Ford’s Fusion or our old friend the Camry.

Even the price isn’t off the dial for a car as well padded as our tester, with a Canadian MSRP of $35,790

Please feel free to subscribe to our channel – we’ll have another Honda up pretty soon, a minivan this time – why at this rate we’ll soon be as popular as the Internet screaming head/conspiracy nuts or twentysomething fashion v-loggers! Haha, just kidding, we’ll never be that popular.